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I have a Python program (below) and when I run it I get the following error:

% python SSH_Prog.py
About to connect...
stderr:  ["bash: -c: line 0: unexpected EOF while looking for matching `''\n", 'bash: -c: line 1: syntax error: unexpected end of file\n']
pwd:  []
stderr:  ['watch: no process found\n']
pwd:  []
^CTraceback (most recent call last):
  File "SSH_Prog.py", line 32, in <module>
    time.sleep(3)
KeyboardInterrupt

I think it is to do with escape sequence probably, and the "\n" character from stdin, but I lack the experience to deal with it.

Here's the program:

import os
import sys
import time
import paramiko
#from ssh import SSHClient

# Define remote machine
host="<ip>"
user="<usrnm>"
passw="<passw>"
client = paramiko.SSHClient()
#client.load_system_host_keys()
client.set_missing_host_key_policy(paramiko.AutoAddPolicy())
# Try SSH connection, catch exception
#if not
print('About to connect...') 

client.connect(host, username=user, password=passw)
# ForLoop to iterate through the interactions
for x in range(10):
    xx = str(x)
    # Commands to execute on local machine
    f = os.popen3('tshark -i eth0 -f snmp -F pcapng -w ~/Desktop/traf_logs/n'+(xx))
    # commands to execute on remote machine
    stdin, stdout, stderr = client.exec_command("watch -n 0.1 'ps -p $(pgrep -d"," -x snmpd) -o rss= | awk '\''{ i += $1 } END { print i }'\'' >> ~/Desktop/mem_logs/mem_"+(xx)+";")        
    print "stderr: ", stderr.readlines()
    print "pwd: ", stdout.readlines()

    g = os.popen3('snmpget -v 2c -c communitystring <ip> sysContact.0')     
    time.sleep(3)

    stdin, stdout, stderr = client.exec_command('killall watch;')          
    print "stderr: ", stderr.readlines()
    print "pwd: ", stdout.readlines()

    ff = os.popen3('killall tshark')        
# terminate connection
client.close()
exit(0)

Do you have any idea to fix it?

Regards.

share|improve this question
2  
Rather than using os.popen and family, check out subprocess.Popen. It's the recommended thing to use these days -- That's just a general comment, not necessarily a solution to your problem –  mgilson Apr 1 '13 at 18:16
    
This has to do with why the watch within exec_command isn't able to find the right process. Run it in parts first and check if the output is what it should be. –  Anirudh Ramanathan Apr 1 '13 at 18:22
    
Can you explain what you're actually trying to do, give a sample of what you expect the command line that arrives at the other end of the ssh connection to look like, etc.? –  abarnert Apr 1 '13 at 18:29
    
You might want to work on your accept-rate before asking more questions. –  hughdbrown Apr 1 '13 at 19:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your first exec_command looks like this:

stdin, stdout, stderr = client.exec_command("watch -n 0.1 'ps -p $(pgrep -d"," -x snmpd) -o rss= | awk '\''{ i += $1 } END { print i }'\'' >> ~/Desktop/mem_logs/mem_"+(xx)+";")        

In other words, the first argument is:

"watch -n 0.1 'ps -p $(pgrep -d"

And your second argument is:

" -x snmpd) -o rss= | awk '\''{ i += $1 } END { print i }'\'' >> ~/Desktop/mem_logs/mem_"+(xx)+";"

If you fire up bash in a terminal and type that first argument (without the quotes), followed by a newline and a ^D, it'll tell you this:

> -bash: unexpected EOF while looking for matching `''
-bash: syntax error: unexpected end of file

Which is exactly what you're getting back from Paramiko.

And the second error is just killall telling you that there is no process named watch, because your first command never started one.

If you just replace the "," with a space, that'll solve that problem… but without knowing why you thought you wanted a "," there, I'm not sure it'll do what you actually were intending to do.

I'm also not sure what the '\'' is supposed to do. Why do you want to triple-quote the arguments to awk, or why you're doing something so complicated when it ought to be equivalent to just { print $1 }, or why you're explicitly asking ps for multiple columns just to use awk to pick out the first one, or…

share|improve this answer
    
That answer suggested two better ways of doing it, and suggested this only "if you prefer to stick with single quotes", and explained that you don't need them for the one at the end… but OK. What about the rest of my questions? Is that awk program supposed to do something different from just { print $1 }? If so, what? More importantly, did you add the "," into the middle of your command for some reason? If so, what reason? –  abarnert Apr 1 '13 at 20:05
    
I see. I used the ","> in the watch command as I has taken the example from somewhere else. I'm not a coder. I've removed it anyway and it works better without. The '\' was suggested by another user to a problem I had here: stackoverflow.com/questions/15713344/… –  uncle-junky Apr 1 '13 at 20:06
    
"I'm also not sure what the '\'' is supposed to do. Why do you want to triple-quote the arguments to awk" Because in the full command, i.e.: watch -n 0.1 'ps -p $(pgrep -d -x snmpd) -o rss= | awk "{ i += $1 } END { print i }"' awk will not run with the use of the quotes "". It will only work with single ''. Try it. "...it ought to be equivalent to just { print $1 }," Really, how? "...or why you're explicitly asking ps for multiple columns just to use awk to pick out the first one..." Because I only need to RSS value. –  uncle-junky Apr 1 '13 at 20:16
    
(1) Of course you can use double-quotes, you just need to escape the $. (2) Because all you're doing is appending $1 to a previously-empty variable, and then printing it; just printing $1 itself does the same thing. (3) So why ask ps to give you multiple columns and then throw away the rest of them, instead of just having ps give you only the one you want? –  abarnert Apr 1 '13 at 20:24
    
Actually, on looking closer… your ps command already does ask for exactly one column (and no header line), so the awk is doing nothing at all. –  abarnert Apr 1 '13 at 20:26

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