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I am working on a rather large query, but am now stuck on the last bit. Given this example table:

  Key1  |  Key2  |  SomeCol  |
    0   |    0   |    ABC    |
    0   |    1   |    123    |
------------------------------
    1   |    5   |    ABC    |
    1   |    6   |    DEF    |
    1   |    7   |    ABC    |
------------------------------
    2   |    4   |    ABC    |
    2   |    5   |    456    |
    2   |    6   |    456    |
------------------------------
    3   |    4   |    ABC    |
    3   |    5   |    456    |
    3   |    6   |    ABC    |
------------------------------
    4   |    4   |    ABC    |
    4   |    5   |    ABC    |
    4   |    6   |    ABC    |

At this point in my query, I have extracted sequential(Key1, Key2) portions of a table and grouped by Key1. I wish to determine if all the values of SomeCol are identical, except for the first row.

Expected results:
  Key1  |  Key2  |  SomeCol  |
    0   |    0   |    ABC    |
    2   |    4   |    ABC    |
    4   |    4   |    ABC    |

I know I can use something like.Any(g => g.SomeCol.Distinct().Count() == 1) in a case where I need all entries to be the same, but I can't seem to figure out how to get the syntax right to Skip(1). Also, I feel that my method of checking equality is sort of a hack. I know I can do this processing easily in C#, but I want to get as much of the processing to happen on the database side. Since my query is currently written in extension methods, I would appreciate in answer in the same syntax. Thanks!

What I have so far:

resultFromRestOfQuery
.GroupBy(g => g.Key1)
????
.SelectMany(g => g.Take(1).Select(h => h)
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

UPDATE

Alright, tested this on your values and it works.

var result = collection
            .OrderBy(p => p.Key1)
            .ThenBy(p => p.Key2)
            .GroupBy(p => p.Key1)
            .Where(p => p.Skip(1)
                    .Select(j => j.SomeCol)
                    .Distinct().Count() == 1)
            .Select(p => p.First())
            .ToList();

UPDATE #2

Perhaps this will help you with performance. Here is another version of this query without using Distinct(). Note the p.Count() > 1 - this is to avoid selecting the 1st row in a group when there's only 1 element in a group. If it's okay to select the first row when there's only one row, simply remove this part of the condition.

 var result = collection
            .OrderBy(p => p.Key1)
            .ThenBy(p => p.Key2)
            .GroupBy(p => p.Key1)
            .Where(p => p.Count() > 1 && p.Skip(1)
                    .Select(j => j.SomeCol)
                    .All(j => j == p.Last().SomeCol))
            .Select(p => p.First())
            .ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
I had thought about skipping the first row prior to checking if all the SomeCol values were equal, but then I hit an issue where I am required to return that first row as the result. –  Jeff Apr 1 '13 at 18:36
    
Wait, do you mean the first row in the entire table, or the first row in each group of Key1? –  Artless Apr 1 '13 at 18:37
    
The first row of each grouped collection. Take a look at the expected results I posted above. For each Key1 I need to check if SomeCol is equivalent for Min(Key2) + 1 to Max(Key2). If that condition is met, then return (Key1, Min(Key2)). I hope that makes sense –  Jeff Apr 1 '13 at 18:40
    
I managed to get your expected result from the data you provided. I updated my answer. –  Artless Apr 1 '13 at 19:02
    
This is close, but your code does not work as intended in the case where the value of SomeCol is the same for a particular value of Key1. In the context of the problem, if the SomeCol value for key pairs (2,5) and (2,6) were changed to "ABC", the function will not return (2,4). I feel that this is really close though. I'll see if I can get this to work.. –  Jeff Apr 1 '13 at 19:25

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