Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My project has following structure.

/src/main/java/
/src/main/resources/
/src/test/java/
/src/test/resources/

I have a file in /src/test/resources/test.csv and I want to load the file from a unit test in /src/test/java/MyTest.java

I had this code but didn't work. I complains "No such file or directory".

BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader (new FileReader(test.csv))

I also tried this

InputStream is = (InputStream) MyTest.class.getResourcesAsStream(test.csv))

This also dosen't work. It returns null. I am using Maven to build my project.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Doesn't work how? What is your error? –  Daniel Kaplan Apr 1 '13 at 18:24
    
it returns null –  LCYSoft Apr 1 '13 at 18:26
    
try this this.getClass().getResource("/test.csv") –  SRy Apr 1 '13 at 18:28
    

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Try the next:

ClassLoader classloader = Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader()
InputStream is = classloader.getResourceAsStream("test.csv");

If the above doesn't work, various projects have been added the following class: ClassLoaderUtil (code here).

share|improve this answer
    
Worked! Thank you so much! –  LCYSoft Apr 1 '13 at 18:42

Try:

InputStream is = MyTest.class.getResourceAsStream("/test.csv");

IIRC getResourceAsStream() by default is relative to the class's package.

share|improve this answer

Does the code work when not running the Maven-build jar, for example when running from your IDE? If so, make sure the file is actually included in the jar. The resources folder should be included in the pom file, in <build><resources>.

share|improve this answer
    
When using eclipse and running code from IDE itself. How can we load resources located at "/src/test/resources" in Java code specifically in unit tests. Consider a standard maven project structure. –  Bhavesh Jul 2 '14 at 9:00

The following class can be used to load a resource from the classpath and also receive a fitting error message in case there's a problem with the given filePath.

import java.io.InputStream;
import java.nio.file.NoSuchFileException;

public class ResourceLoader
{
    private String filePath;

    public ResourceLoader(String filePath)
    {
        this.filePath = filePath;

        if(filePath.startsWith("/"))
        {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Relative paths may not have a leading slash!");
        }
    }

    public InputStream getResource() throws NoSuchFileException
    {
        ClassLoader classLoader = this.getClass().getClassLoader();

        InputStream inputStream = classLoader.getResourceAsStream(filePath);

        if(inputStream == null)
        {
            throw new NoSuchFileException("Resource file not found. Note that the current directory is the source folder!");
        }

        return inputStream;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
ClassLoader loader = Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader();
InputStream is = loader.getResourceAsStream("test.csv");

If you use context ClassLoader to find a resource then definitely it will cost application performance.

share|improve this answer
    
Who asked about performance in this question? The OP asked this for a test. c2.com/cgi/wiki?PrematureOptimization –  Igor Rodriguez Dec 25 '14 at 9:53

protected by Paul Vargas Apr 6 at 16:28

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.