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This question is NOT question like "inheritence vs composition".

I understand completely how inheritance differs from composition, I know the Liskov substitution principle, the diamond problem, advantages and disadvantages both of them and both concepts seem to be simple. But there is so many questions everywhere about inheritance and composition, that i thought, maybe I misunderstand something in this simple idea.

Lets focus on Go. Go is a language from Google and everybody is excited it has no inheritance, it has no classes, but it has composition and this is cool. For me, the composition in Go gives you exactly the same functionality as inheritance in other languages (C++, Java, ...) - component methods are automatically exposed and available as methods of later structs, like here:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

type Car struct{
    name string
}

func (c *Car) move() bool { 
    return true
} 

type MyCar struct{
    Car   
}

func main() {
    var c MyCar
    fmt.Print(c.move())
}

So to sum everything up, composition is better than inheritance because:

  1. is more flexible (allows you to change the component in runtime, so you can affect the way "classes" work.
  2. is free from diamond problem (but diamond problem is solvable, so this is not strong advantage)

And if you consider Go and its interfaces (every object, that has methods defined by an interface, implements this interface implicite) do you have the ultimate solution? Can we say that composition with some syntactic sugar can replace inheritance?

Such design agrees with Liskov substitution principle. Do I miss something or inheritance (known from any language) has no advantages over composition (and interfaces) known from Go?

===== edit1 =====

For clarification, it is possible in Go to use "standard" composition mechanism, like this (this example behaves like the previous one):

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

type Car struct{
    name string
}

func (c *Car) move() bool { 
    return true
} 

type MyCar struct{
    car Car
}

func (c *MyCar) move() bool { 
    return c.car.move()
} 

func main() {
    var c MyCar
    fmt.Print(c.move())
}

But if you use it like in the previous example, all the methods are available implicite "in MyCar class".

share|improve this question
1  
You're not far from truth. Maybe this will clear things up: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Composition_over_inheritance –  icepack Apr 1 '13 at 18:53
1  
I'm not familiar with Go, but this looks an awful lot like mixins in ruby, which, I believe, are a way of accomplishing multiple inheritance. This does not look like composition in it's true sense (where you would be delegating responsibilities to another object). This confuses your question since it looks like you are comparing two different methods of inheritance. –  hifier Apr 1 '13 at 20:21
1  
@objectiveGeek thats funny, because my example shows normal composition but with automatic method promotion (a syntactic sugar). There is no magic in it - you still can access components like this: var c MyCar; c.Car.move(); /*or the same */ c.move(). So if this is the same as inheritance to you, then the answer to my question is "yes, you can use composition with some syntactic sugar to replace inheritance" –  Wojciech Danilo Apr 1 '13 at 21:04
1  
@danilo2 Inheritance is normally implemented via composition if you go low-level enough. So yes, to be formalistic - you can define a reduction from inheritance to composition thus all the functionality of inheritance can be obtained via composition. The main reason for using inheritance, IMHO, is a better correlation to design (when appropriate, of course). –  icepack Apr 1 '13 at 21:22
1  
@danilo2 OK, interesting. Your question makes quite a bit more sense to me now! –  hifier Apr 1 '13 at 22:36

3 Answers 3

Sorry for necroposting, but it seems that the question and the answers concentrate on code reuse. We can use both inheritance and composition to reuse some code from the common "ancestor", it's true. And composition works better here.

But inheritance is primarily not for code reuse, it's for dynamic binding. The "is a" relationship can be practically formulated as follows: calling code is using interface of the object and knows nothing about particular implementation.

Pseudocode:

// Interface
class A { 
  drawMe() {} ; 
};
// Implementations
class Rect:A { 
  drawMe() {DrawRect();}; 
};
class Circle:A { 
  drawMe() {Drawcircle();}; 
};

main() {
  // We fill the array in one part of the program
  Array_of_A arr;
  arr.add(new Rect);
  arr.add(new Circle);
  // We can use the array in completely another part
  // without any idea of what the items really are,
  // only know the interface
  foreach(item from arr) {
     item->drawMe();
  }
}

In many languages (e.g. like C++) inheritance is the only practical way to say "this object implements this interface". And also it allows to do some things like code reuse, which really are better done with composition.

I know nothing of Go, but I understand your words correctly, it offers another way of defining "this object implements this interface":

every object, that has methods defined by an interface, implements this interface implicite

So if you also can call the objects by interface, it does the work of inheritance. But it additionally allows the substitution of the base class, which is why I think they call it composition. And maybe because of it being internally implemented in some way other than vtable, but I can't think of where it can make any difference.

So, inheritance can be replaced by composition if you find a way to say "this object implements this interface".

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Nice question ...

You may want to prefer inheritance over composition when you want to distinguish semantically between "A is a B" and "A has a B". E.g. class Car may have an Engine member (composition), but may be (i.e. inherit from) a Vehicle.

I think the distinction plays out in having to maintain the number of methods shared by your two classes. When you inherit, you only need to override those (virtual) functions in the base class that you really need to; if you were to use purely composition, you'd need to re-implement every method of your member class that's public.

Ultimately, the "best" method is the one that is most suitable for your current application.

Edit:

There's a small but succinct debate about it here: http://www.sitepoint.com/forums/showthread.php?568744-When-to-use-inheritance

as well as a Wikipedia article(!) about it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Composition_over_inheritance#Drawbacks

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I know this disadventage, but please look at Go - if you use composition, you do not need to rewrite every method, because all methods are propagated automatically - please look at my example. –  Wojciech Danilo Apr 1 '13 at 19:31
    
Sorry, I was slightly sloppy reading your question. I guess you're asking, "Is the composition offered by Go a better solution than separate inheritance and composition in other languages?" I don't know ... To me, it looks like mixins offer pretty much the same functionality, at essentially the same amount of effort as the composition example you presented up there –  maditya Apr 1 '13 at 20:05
    
Not exactly - I'm writing my own programming language and I'm considering abandon inheritance in favor of composition. So the question is completely language agnostic. I do not want to compare Go vs Java mechanisms - I'm talking about any language (this can be in particular Go), so if the composition in Go is as good as inheritance in other languages, than yes, it is possbile to completely replace inheritance by composition in general. –  Wojciech Danilo Apr 1 '13 at 20:12
    
I don't know about that ... the composition in Go is, as you yourself point out, somewhat different from what is thought of as composition in other languages ... so to me it's more accurate to say that "it is possible to completely replace inheritance by the type of composition offered by Go" –  maditya Apr 1 '13 at 20:18
    
Composition in Go is normal composition with some syntactic sugar to implicit promote methods of components. There is no magic - only special syntax. –  Wojciech Danilo Apr 1 '13 at 21:00

The Short Answer

It's really not as black and white as that. In short, yes. Any situation that can be solved with inheritance can be solved, near enough, by composition. So in short, the answer to your question is yes; inheritance can be replaced by composition.

Why it's not that simple

When to use Inheritance
It's not a matter of whether you CAN swap them out. It depends on the context that you're programming in, and it becomes more of a question of whether you SHOULD swap them out. Take this simple example in Java:

public class Person
{
    // Assume every person can speak.
    public void speak()
    {
    }
}

Now, let's say we have another class, Dave. Dave IS a person.

public class Dave extends Person
{
     public void speak() { System.out.println("Hello!"); }
     public void killSomeone() {} // Dave is a violent Guy.
}

Now would it make more sense for the class Dave to look like this?

public class Dave
{
     private Person p;
     // Composition variant.

     public void speak() { p.speak(); }
     public void killSomeone() {} // Dave is a violent Guy.
}

This code implies Dave has a person. It's not as simple and doesn't explain itself as well. Also, anything a Person can do, Dave can do, so it makes sense that we assert Dave is a "Person".

When to use Composition

We use Composition when we only want to expose part of the class' interface. Following our previous example, let's say Dave has a Guitar. The guitar has a more complex interface:

public class Guitar
{
     public Color color;
     // Guitar's color.
     public Tuning tuning;
     // Guitar's tuning.

     public void tuneGuitar()
     {}

     public void playChord()
     {}

     public void setColor()
     {}
}

Now, if we were to inherit this class, what would the outcome be?

Well, class Dave would now have attributes color and tuning. Does Dave have a tuning? I think not! This is where inheritance makes no sense. We don't want to expose the entire Guitar interface along with the Dave interface. We only want the user to be able to access what Dave needs to access, so in this case we would use some composition:

public class Dave extends Person
{
     private Guitar guitar;
     // Hide the guitar object. Then limit what the user can do with it.

     public void changeGuitarColor(Color newColor)
     {
         // So this code makes a lot more sense than if we had used inheritance.
         guitar.setColor(newColor);
     }


     public void speak() { System.out.println("Hello!"); }
     public void killSomeone() {} // Dave is a violent Guy.
}

Conclusion

It's really not a case of what can replace the other. It's about the situation that you are implementing the techniques in. Hopefully, by the end of the example you'll see that inheritance is for situations where one object IS A object, and composition is used when one object HAS A object.

share|improve this answer
    
Chris I very appreciate your answer, but your answer is language syntax specyfic - please see my example. I understand is a and has, but using some special syntax, like in Go, we can mimic both behaviors with composition. You can get used to the Go syntax and see that MyCar is a Car if Car is in list of its "components" - but this is only syntax and apperance - it could be improoven. We can use in Go "normal" composition, as you have shown here it the components are named (in my example, the Car is name of a type and it is called an unnamed component or unnamed variable) –  Wojciech Danilo Apr 1 '13 at 19:35
    
I simply used Java as an example, because it's the language I am most familiar with and I knew I could explain the concept better with it. I'm sorry, I don't completely understand your comment. –  christopher Apr 1 '13 at 19:39
    
Please look at edited question and additional example. Sorry for being not clear to you. I was trying to say, that you are talking about apperance of things (something looks like or something is like something else). This apperance is strongly connected with syntax. I dont want to talk about specific language (this should be language agnostic question). In Go inheritance is replaced by composition and special syntax allowing promoting methods of the components. I wanted to know if it is a "silver bullet" or it is weaker in some cases than standard inheritance. –  Wojciech Danilo Apr 1 '13 at 20:59
1  
@danilo2 I think your question is just a language-specific to Go and ChrisCooney's answer is language-specific to Java. We all have to code in something, and if that something doesn't have the Go-like feature you described then there is a big reason to use inheritance in many instances. I don't think you can separate language from the question as easily as you'd like. –  tcarvin Apr 2 '13 at 20:55
    
I tried not to be language specyfic, because I'm developing right now my own language (a little bit more declarative and reactive, but that is not important right now) and I am considering to abandon inheritance in favor of some kind of composition. I hope now, you understeand, why I dont want to e "language specific". –  Wojciech Danilo Apr 2 '13 at 23:18

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