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Why does this not work:

$(document).on('click','a',myFunction);
var myFunction = function() {
   debugger;
}

When this does:

$(document).on('click','a',function() {
   debugger;
}

I've started to learn more by naming all my anonymous functions and breaking them out into their own separate named functions.

share|improve this question
2  
Oh, it's because I have to define the function before I reference it. It has to be above in the source code order. – Phillip Senn Apr 1 '13 at 19:03
    
But isn't there a way to hoist the function declaration? – Phillip Senn Apr 1 '13 at 19:15
1  
Function declarations are always hoisted. But what you have there is not a declaration, it's a function expression. See the article linked from the bottom of my answer for details. – bfavaretto Apr 1 '13 at 19:16
    
The page says that Function Declarations can not appear in Block ({ ... }). I think what this is telling me is that I shouldn't use Function Declarations inside of another function, and thereby it would place all functions in the window scope, which of course would be bad. – Phillip Senn Apr 1 '13 at 19:36
    
No, nested function declarations are fine (and desirable). That quote refers to blocks like those of if and for statements; I guess FunctionBody is like a special kind of block, and declarations are allowed there. – bfavaretto Apr 1 '13 at 19:39

You have to swap the lines:

var myFunction = function() {
   debugger;
}
$(document).on('click','a', myFunction);

Otherwise, you would be assigning undefined as the event handler, as the variable myFunction doesn't have a value yet when you were passing it to .on.

Also: assigning a function to a variable like that doesn't make it named, it's still an anonymous function, just stored in a variable. A named function would be:

var myFunction = function someName() {
    debugger;
}

See Named function expressions demystified for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow. JavaScript never ceases to surprise me. That's why I ask these fundamental questions, because I always learn something I never expect. – Phillip Senn Apr 1 '13 at 19:12
1  
@Benjamin Thanks for the edit, that links makes the answer a lot better. – bfavaretto Apr 1 '13 at 19:13
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Instead of saying:

var myFunction = function() {
   debugger;
}

you need to say:

function myFunction() {
   debugger;
}

This will declare the function on the first pass so that it can be referenced during program execution.

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