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Given a simplified table structure like this:

 CREATE TABLE t1 (
        id INT,
        num INT,
        CONSTRAINT t1_pk
        PRIMARY KEY (id),
        CONSTRAINT t1_uk
        UNIQUE (id, num)
    )

Can I use a subquery like this for inserting records without causing a race condition?

INSERT INTO t1 (
    id,
    num
) VALUES (
    1,
    (
        SELECT MAX(num) + 1
        FROM   t1
    )
)

Or are subqueries not atomic? I'm worried about simultaneous INSERTs grabbing the same value for num and then causing a unique constraint violation.

share|improve this question
    
And on an unrelated note, does anyone know why SO rejects any question with the phrase "CREATE TABLE" in it? Just gives me an error... –  drrcknlsn Apr 1 '13 at 19:31
    
Yes this will cause a race condition, what you can try to do is use sequence to generate number by using seq.nextval this will return unique number for each insert. –  rs. Apr 1 '13 at 19:39
    
Is there a reason that you wouldn't want to use a sequence here? –  Justin Cave Apr 1 '13 at 19:48
    
I need the sequence of numbers to be guaranteed gap-free. Sequences don't have this guarantee, so I can't use that method unfortunately. –  drrcknlsn Apr 1 '13 at 20:07
    
Why do you think you need a "guaranteed gap-free" series of numbers? –  APC Apr 1 '13 at 21:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, this can most certainly create a race condition, because while all statements are guaranteed atomic, this does not require them to have operated across an unchanging data set during the separate parts of the query's execution.

A client submits your above query. So long as the engine finds the MAX(num) while holding only locks that are compatible with other readers, then another client can find the same MAX(num) before the INSERT is performed.

There are four ways around this problem that I know of:

  1. Use a sequence. In the INSERT you can just do sequencename.nextval to return the next unique number to be inserted.

    SQL> create sequence t1num;
    
    Sequence created.
    
    SQL> select t1num.nextval from dual;
    
       NEXTVAL
    ----------
             1
    
    SQL> select t1num.nextval from dual;
    
       NEXTVAL
    ----------
             2
    
  2. Retry on failure. I read a credible article about a very high transactions-per-second system that had a scenario not exactly like this one but suffering from the same race condition of the INSERT possibly using the wrong value. They found that the highest TPS was achieved by simply--having given num a unique constraint--if the INSERT was rejected due to a violation of the unique constraint, the client would simply retry.

  3. Add a locking hint that forces the engine to block other readers until the INSERT is completed. While this may be easy, it may or may not be suitable for high concurrency. If the MAX() is performed with a single seek, and the blocking is not long and does not block many clients, it could be perfectly acceptable.

  4. Use a separate one-row helper table to record the next/most recent value for num. Perform an UPDATE on the helper table, simultaneously pulling out the value, then use this separately to INSERT to the main table. In my mind, while this has some annoyance of not being a single query, plus, it does have the issue that if the client manages to "reserve" a value of num, but then fails for any reason to actually perform the INSERT, then a gap can occur in the values of num in the table.

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I was afraid of that. So I would need a table lock to accomplish this? –  drrcknlsn Apr 1 '13 at 19:37
    
Thank you very much for this in depth answer. #1 and #4 are not suitable for my needs, since neither is immune to possible gaps. I'm thinking #2 may be the best bet. –  drrcknlsn Apr 1 '13 at 20:07
2  
What is the harm in having a gap? If you go with retry-on-failure, be absolutely certain that your Max() query does a seek and is not doing a scan. Without this in place you will have a system that WILL fail some day as it grows in size. Also, please see my update to #3. –  ErikE Apr 1 '13 at 20:19
    
In my particular use case, the harm is bad UX. There is a cap of allowable records, and each record represents a slot. With any gaps, the user would not be able to use all the slots (finding/filling gaps is non-trivial). The numbers themselves are also important, representing positions which the user is free to modify after initial creation, but which can't really be skipped over. Sequences also seem impractical just due to the number I would need to create and maintain (being in the tens or hundreds of thousands). Thanks for the tip on max(). –  drrcknlsn Apr 1 '13 at 21:52
1  
Please include more details on the use case next time. By filling in some of the details you help people answer with real "meat" instead of querying you about the missing details. I would have written my answer differently had I known about the per-user requirement. –  ErikE Apr 1 '13 at 22:00
SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL SERIALIZABLE;
INSERT INTO t1 (id, num) VALUES (1, (SELECT MAX(num) + 1 FROM t1));
COMMIT;

or

LOCK TABLE t1 IN EXCLUSIVE MODE;
INSERT INTO t1 (id, num) VALUES (1, (SELECT MAX(num) + 1 FROM t1));
COMMIT;

both causing performance issues for simultaneous processes doing the same operation. But if a guaranteed gap-less sequence is a requirement then this is the cost.

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DROP SCHEMA tmp CASCADE;
CREATE SCHEMA tmp ;
SET search_path=tmp;

Al subqueries should be evaluated as if the were snapshots taken at query-start. Works without additional measures in Postgres:

CREATE TABLE hopla
        ( the_id SERIAL NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
        , tralala varchar
        );

INSERT INTO hopla(tralala)
SELECT 'tralala_' || gs::text
FROM generate_series(1,4) gs
        ;

SELECT * FROM hopla;
INSERT INTO hopla(the_id, tralala)
SELECT mx.mx + row_number() OVER (ORDER BY org.the_id)
        , org.tralala
FROM hopla org
, (SELECT MAX(the_id) AS mx FROM hopla) mx
        ;

SELECT * FROM hopla;

Result/output:

CREATE TABLE
INSERT 0 4
 the_id |  tralala  
--------+-----------
      1 | tralala_1
      2 | tralala_2
      3 | tralala_3
      4 | tralala_4
(4 rows)

INSERT 0 4
 the_id |  tralala  
--------+-----------
      1 | tralala_1
      2 | tralala_2
      3 | tralala_3
      4 | tralala_4
      5 | tralala_1
      6 | tralala_2
      7 | tralala_3
      8 | tralala_4
(8 rows)
share|improve this answer
    
I don't see any concurrency going on here to check if this pattern "works" without race conditions. –  ErikE Apr 1 '13 at 21:54

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