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I apologize in advance if this has been covered elsewhere, but the vague/common terms involved means that I found a lot of irrelevant hits and nothing that was helpful. Since my project is rather large I don't think it'd be reasonable for me to provide a M(N)WE, so instead I'm looking for ideas as to what else to check. Here's the code block:

try {
    myClassObject = new MyClass(string1, string2, string3, otherClassObject); (1)
    System.out.println("Test"); (2)
} catch (Exception e){ 
    System.out.println(e.getMessage() + " " + e.getStackTrace()); (3)
}

My constructor(1) is never called. However, neither (2) nor (3) are called (i.e. the test string is never printed nor is an exception ever printed). From my understand of a try-catch block, this shouldn't be possible.

I use Eclipse's debug mode and am able to step over that line. All 4 objects are defined and can be printed just fine (so it's not an access issue). All 4 objects have their expected value when viewed in debug mode. However, debug mode skips from (1) on to the rest of my code, never hitting (2) nor (3). A debug point placed in the constructor for MyClass is never reached.

I can call a default constructor of MyClass in place of the 4 parameter constructor and it behaves as desired. I can then copy/paste the contents of the 4 parameter constructor after (2) and all 4 parameters set properly and the object is created as desired. Obviously this is a viable work-around, but I can't find a reason that the 4 parameter constructor is failing.

In short, I have no idea how this is possible, let alone how to stop it from happening.

Edit: I've performed clean -> build -> debug on the code several times, so I'm fairly confident it is not a .class issue. Just in case I deleted the .bin and refreshed, which had no effect.

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1  
I presume you debug a .class file (byte code) that is not synchronized with your source. Remove bin manually, hit F5. –  Aubin Apr 1 '13 at 19:36
    
try to create new project then try to debug it. There may be a cached value causes unsynronized files –  mmc18 Apr 1 '13 at 19:38
    
I agree with previous comment. You can use Project / Clean... from your eclipse menu –  Brad Apr 1 '13 at 19:40
    
As we are computer engineer, do not hesitate to use "restart" in case of emergency –  mmc18 Apr 1 '13 at 19:44
    
Remaining possibilities are that either the constructor of MyClass to catch another exception or another exception to throw different from Exception. –  user1929959 Apr 1 '13 at 19:45

1 Answer 1

Could there be an error which does not implement Throwable and therefore cannot be caught? What are you doing in the constructor? For instance ChuckNorris Exception :) Uncatchable ChuckNorrisException

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Creating a new project fixed it. For reference, though, my constructor was just calling 4 sets, one on each parameter. Even if it was throwing an error however, I think debug mode would still have allowed me to step through and see the error being throw. –  JuniorIncanter Apr 2 '13 at 14:56

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