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I'm not quite sure how to word this question in a sentence so I had difficulty searching previous posts. This comes up frequently for me and I'd like to get consensus on how to approach it.

Say you have two classes, ExampleClass and ExampleClassManager. ExampleClass has an Update(Data data) method which is called from ExampleClassManager. However, ExampleClass can be in one of two states, and in the Enabled state it wants to process the data passed to it in Update, and in the disabled state it doesn't do anything with the data at all.

Should I be checking for the state in the ExampleClassManager and not passing the data at all if it is disabled, or should I pass the data regardless and ignore it within ExampleClass?

Here's a code example in case I didn't articulate it clearly.

public class ExampleClass {
    public bool Enabled {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public void Update(Data data) {
        if(Enabled) {
            //do stuff with data
        }
    }
}

public class ExampleClassManager {
    private List<ExampleClass> exampleClassList=new List<ExampleClass>();

    public void UpdateList() {
        foreach(ExampleClass exampleClass in exampleClassList) {
            exampleClass.Update(data);
        }
    }
}

or

public class ExampleClass {
    public bool Enabled {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public void Update(Data data) {
        //do stuff with data
    }
}

public class ExampleClassManager {
    private List<ExampleClass> exampleClassList=new List<ExampleClass>();

    public void UpdateList() {
        foreach(ExampleClass exampleClass in exampleClassList) {
            if(exampleClass.Enabled) {
                exampleClass.Update(data);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
Well, questions I would ask are: A) What happens if you "Updated" a disabled ExampleClass, then enabled that instance. Should it show the data it was bound against before being disabled, or should it show the updated data that was provided to it when it was disabled? B) Does the ExampleClassManager care whether or not ExampleClass is enabled when distributing its data? C) Do you expect to have other implementations/subclasses of ExampleClass where it would want the data or have other "updatable" concepts that should change when "updated" even if disabled? –  Chris Sinclair Apr 1 '13 at 19:40
    
Also D) Do you want calling code to force updates on disabled ExampleClass instances? In your second example, calling code can ignore the fact that an instance is disabled and force changes upon it. All code from any class calling Update must then fulfill this "don't update me if I'm disabled" contract, but is under no obligation to do so. –  Chris Sinclair Apr 1 '13 at 19:53
1  
It really depends on how important the processing of the input data is. In this scenario, the ExampleClass has not choosen how to deal with the disabled state, rather, it makes it clients make that choice. You could consider that bad design. It does not inform you that nothing will happen with your input. If the processing of your data by ExampleClass is important, you may want to check for this disabled state. However, how do you respond to the disbled state? Throw an exception? Ignore? Try another route? Log something? –  oɔɯǝɹ Apr 1 '13 at 19:57
    
Thank you for your responses thus far. Without exception I don't want Update to be called on ExampleClass if it is disabled, so I think it makes sense to follow the first pattern. –  tmakino Apr 1 '13 at 20:28
1  
If it is ExampleClass who decides whether to reach different states or not, then definitely go with option 1. I'd make the setter for Enable private then. –  Julián Urbano Apr 1 '13 at 20:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Given that it depends on a property of ExampleClass, I'd choose option 1 and check within ExampleClass.Update. Otherwise, any object with access to an ExampleClass object could call Update regardless of the state. By checking within the Update method, you make sure it will only proceed if the object is enabled. The question here is who can change the object's status?

See the Law of Demeter:

Each unit should have only limited knowledge about other units: only units "closely" related to the current unit.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this brings up a related question. If I have a number of ExampleClasses and one ExampleClassManager to manage them, would it be better to make "Enabled" private and have each ExampleClass be responsible for its own state? Or should I make "Enabled" a public property and have the manager be setting the ExampleClass states? In my simplified example, whether or not "Enabled" is true/false depends on how the ExampleClass internally reacts to the "Data" objects that are passed to it. I may have just answered my own question with that last sentence, but please confirm. –  tmakino Apr 2 '13 at 13:27
    
If each ExampleClass is completely responsible for its own state, my manager class just becomes a glorified Dictionary<int, ExampleClass> where int is a unique ID. Would you recommend having a complex "Manager" class with simple ExampleClasses, or a complex ExampleClass with a simple Manager? Is there a general accepted answer to this, or does it depend on each specific case? –  tmakino Apr 2 '13 at 13:31
    
As I see it, yes, you answered your own question :-) If the sole responsible for state changes is the ExampleClass, make the setter private and the getter public. You should also consider the setter as internal if other classes within your assembly could change it too. –  Julián Urbano Apr 2 '13 at 14:04
    
As to the Manager...what does it do besides calling Update? If it acts just as a collection of ExampleClass then yes, I'd forget about it. If it has some extra functionality for example when adding/removing ExampleClass objects, then leave it. It really depends on what it does. –  Julián Urbano Apr 2 '13 at 14:06
    
The manager is responsible for creating new ExampleClass objects, and it also contains two lists, one contains Enabled ExampleClasses, and the other contains Disabled ExampleClasses. ExampleClass is "Enabled" when it is created, and it internally disables itself based on the Data it processes. If the ExampleClass becomes disabled, the Manager moves it to the Disabled list. –  tmakino Apr 2 '13 at 14:15

"How much management should my manager class do?" Your option 2 is the "micromanagement" approach - that the Manager should dictate every little detail to the ExampleClass about what it should do and how.

Typically, that's more structure-based programming than object oriented programming. I would expect your manager to tell your object "go do this", and not worry about the details. The ExampleClass should encapsulate all of its behavior internally, and not force the manager to worry about it.

My vote is for option 1, with the caveat that these are general principles, and you'll always be able to find some case where you want option 2.

One question to ask - is there a reason that ExampleClass.Enabled.get is public, aside from letting the manager check? If that's the only reason it's public, then it's internal implementation, and the gettor should be private. If you have a lot of things looking at this field, that could imply your option 2 workflow is more natural for this class.

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I'd choose option 2, classManager should manage the objects, he should know whether fire the update or not. The update method of the single object should do what it says (update the object and not doing nothing).

@caerolus: I can't comment yet... anyway neither of the example given broke the law of demeter

Anyway I think this is a somewhat personal choice question, maybe it's more suitable for stack exchange?

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Let's say you have two objects, Company and Employee. Do you have the company check when the employee is hungry, or do you have the employee check if he is hungry? Sounds like you want the employee to check if he is hungry, right? But what if the company wants to order food for all the employees, then the company needs to check if the employee is hungry.

So my point is, it depends on the design and the context of when to check and who is checking and why. In your example, I would say it doesn't matter because the context isn't set.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice example! But I think it's rather like this: the operation is Eat (Update here). Who decides whether to eat or not? The employee. May the company check whether an employee is Hungry (Enabled here) or not? Yes, but ultimately, it's the Employee's decision to eat or not. So you can let everyone know if you're hungry or not, but only you should decide whether to eat or not...and therefore not be hungry anymore. –  Julián Urbano Apr 1 '13 at 20:39

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