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I need to filter strings by the criterion that they contain no character twice.

  • The strings are many (say 1.4 trillion).
  • The strings are short (around 8 characters).
  • The strings are unique (caching won't work).
  • The strings have a big character set (say any Unicode character).
  • The strings usually meet the criterion (say 2/3 have no repeating characters).

The using code would look like this:

>>> candidate_strings = ["foobnehg", "barfnehg", "bazfnehg"]
>>> result_strings = [s if unique_chars(s) for s in candidate_strings]
>>> print(result_strings)
["barfnehg", "bazfnehg"]

I implemented a naive version, simply iterating the string:

def unique_chars_naive(string_given):
    """
    Checks if a given string contains only unique characters.
    This version iterates the given string, saving all occurred characters.
    """
    chars_seen = []
    for char in string_given:
        if char in chars_seen:
            return False
        chars_seen.append(char)
    return True

My next-best idea was to use a set, so I implemented that:

def unique_chars_set(string_given):
    """
    Checks if a given string contains only unique characters.
    This version exploits that a set contains only unique entries.
    """
    return len(string_given) == len(set(string_given))

Saving the functions to a file UniqueCharacters.py, timed them:

$ python3 -m timeit -n 100000 --setup='import UniqueCharacters; candidate_strings = ["foobnehg", "barfnehg", "bazfnehg"]' '[UniqueCharacters.unique_chars_naive(s) for s in candidate_strings]'
100000 loops, best of 3: 20.3 usec per loop

$ python3 -m timeit -n 100000 --setup='import UniqueCharacters; candidate_strings = ["foobnehg", "barfnehg", "bazfnehg"]' '[UniqueCharacters.unique_chars_set(s) for s in candidate_strings]'
100000 loops, best of 3: 17.7 usec per loop

This shows that the unique_chars_set is faster by about 15 % for this dataset.

Is there a faster way to do this? With regular expressions maybe? Is there some method in the standard library that does this?

share|improve this question
    
Might there be repeated strings in candidate_strings? –  Jared Apr 1 '13 at 20:15
2  
Test with longer words. –  Steven Rumbalski Apr 1 '13 at 20:18
    
Do all the strings contain only lowercase alphabetical characters? If not, do they only contain ASCII characters? –  Kevin Apr 1 '13 at 20:20
    
Maybe use a array with 26 elements - you can map each char to an element in this array very quickly as chars are just ints. You can then set a flag in the cell if the letter is present and if it's already set you have a duplicate. This would be a variant of a bucket sort. –  Boris the Spider Apr 1 '13 at 20:20
    
I doubt any solution will be faster than the one using set, even for longer words. –  Pedro Werneck Apr 1 '13 at 20:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Let me start off by saying that I suspect that you are optimizing when you don't need to. Python is a high-level language that supports thinking about computation in a high-level manner. A solution that is readable, elegant, and reusable is often going to be better than one that is blazingly fast, but hard to understand.

When, and only when, you determine that speed is an issue, then you should proceed with the optimizations. Perhaps even write a C extension for the computationally intense parts.

That being said, here's a comparison of a few techniques:

def unique_chars_set(s):
    return len(s) == len(set(s))

def unique_chars_frozenset(s):
    return len(s) == len(frozenset(s))

def unique_chars_counter(s):
    return Counter(s).most_common(1)[0][1] > 1

def unique_chars_sort(s):
    ss = ''.join(sorted(s))
    prev = ''
    for c in ss:
        if c == prev:
            return False
        prev = c
    return True

def unique_chars_bucket(s):
    buckets = 255 * [False]
    for c in s:
        o = ord(c)
        if buckets[o]:
            return False
        buckets[o] = True
    return True

And here is the performance comparisons (in IPython):

In [0]: %timeit -r10 [unique_chars_set(s) for s in candidate_strings]
100000 loops, best of 10: 6.63 us per loop

In [1]: %timeit -r10 [unique_chars_frozenset(s) for s in candidate_strings]
100000 loops, best of 10: 6.81 us per loop

In [2]: %timeit -r10 [unique_chars_counter(s) for s in candidate_strings]
10000 loops, best of 10: 83.1 us per loop

In [3]: %timeit -r10 [unique_chars_sort(s) for s in candidate_strings]
100000 loops, best of 10: 13.1 us per loop

In [4]: %timeit -r10 [unique_chars_bucket(s) for s in candidate_strings]
100000 loops, best of 10: 15 us per loop

Conclusion: set is elegant and faster than many other obvious methods. But the differences are so small, it doesn't matter anyway.

For more benchmarks, see @FrancisAvila's answer.

share|improve this answer

I created a file with a timing and testing harness to try a whole bunch of different approaches.

The fastest one I found is regex-based, but it's only a tiny bit faster than your fastest len(set())-based approach. It's the isunique_reg() function below.

import re
import array
import collections
import bisect

re_dup_g = re.compile(r'(.).*\1', re.DOTALL)
re_dup_ng = re.compile(r'(.).*?\1', re.DOTALL)


def isunique_reg(s, search=re_dup_g.search):
    return search(s) is None

def isunique_reng(s, search=re_dup_ng.search):
    return search(s) is None

def isunique_set(s, set=set, len=len):
    return len(s) == len(set(s))

def isunique_forset(s, set=set):
    seen = set()
    add = seen.add
    for c in s:
        if c in seen:
            return False
        add(c)
    return True

def isunique_array(s, array=array.array):
    seen = array('u')
    append = seen.append
    for c in s:
        if c in seen:
            return False
        append(c)
    return True

def isunique_deque(s, deque=collections.deque):
    seen = deque()
    append = seen.append
    for c in s:
        if c in seen:
            return False
        append(c)
    return True

def isunique_bisect(s, find=bisect.bisect_right, array=array.array):
    seen = array('u')
    insert = seen.insert
    for c in s:
        i = find(seen, c)
        if i and seen[i-1] == c:
            return False
        insert(i, c)
    return True

def isunique_bisectl(s, find=bisect.bisect_right):
    seen = []
    insert = seen.insert
    for c in s:
        i = find(seen, c)
        if i and seen[i-1] == c:
            return False
        insert(i, c)
    return True

def isunique_count(s, Counter=collections.Counter):
    return Counter(s).most_common(1)[0][1]==1

def isunique_list(s):
    seen = []
    append = seen.append
    for c in s:
        if c in seen:
            return False
        append(c)
    return True


def _test():
    funcs = [f for n,f in globals().items() if n.startswith('isunique_')]
    cases = [
        (u'string given', False),
        (u'string uoqzd', True),
    ]
    for func in funcs:
        for s,rv in cases:
            try:
                assert rv is func(s)
            except AssertionError, e:
                print "%s(%r) is not %r" % (func.__name__, s, rv)
                raise e

def _time():
    import timeit
    funcs = [f for n,f in globals().items() if n.startswith('isunique_')]
    funcs.sort(key=lambda f: f.__name__)
    cases = [
        ('!uniq', u'string given', False),
        ('uniq', u'string uoqzd', True),
    ]

    casenames = [name for name, _, _ in cases]
    fwidth = max(len(f.__name__) for f in funcs)
    timeitsetup = 's = {!r}; from __main__ import {} as u'

    print('{: <{fwidth}s}|{: >15s}|{: >15s}'.format('func', *casenames, fwidth=fwidth))
    print('-'*(fwidth+2+15+15))
    for f in funcs:
        times = [timeit.timeit('u(s)', setup=timeitsetup.format(input, f.__name__)) for _, input, _ in cases]
        print('{: <{fwidth}s}|{: >15.10f}|{: >15.10f}'.format(f.__name__, *times, fwidth=fwidth))

if __name__=='__main__':
    _test()
    _time()

On CPython 2.7.1 I get the following results (unfortunately I don't have a CPython 3.x handy):

func            |          !uniq|           uniq
------------------------------------------------
isunique_array  |   6.0237820148|  11.0871050358
isunique_bisect |  10.8665719032|  18.4178640842
isunique_bisectl|   8.2648131847|  13.9763219357
isunique_count  |  23.1477651596|  23.5043439865
isunique_deque  |   4.0739829540|   7.3630020618
isunique_forset |   2.8148539066|   4.1761989594
isunique_list   |   3.6703650951|   6.9271368980
isunique_reg    |   1.7293550968|   2.8794138432
isunique_reng   |   1.9672849178|   3.3768401146
isunique_set    |   2.3157420158|   2.2436211109

You'll notice that when a string is not unique, the regex-based approach is faster than the set-based one, but the worst-case for the regex-based approach is slower than for sets.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried using a set, as you suggested. For the 3 strings in my example it is 40 % slower than using a list. The insert time seems to overweight the time for the membership test at short lengths. I added seldomly repeating characters as a requirement. –  Bengt Apr 2 '13 at 1:06
    
@bngtlrs, I completely rewrote my answer with a survey of approaches, and discovered a regex approach that is a (tiny bit) faster than len(set(s)). –  Francis Avila Apr 2 '13 at 3:53
    
The RegEx you used was suggested and rejected for being slower here before. I extended your answer with results for Python 3 that confirm this. –  Bengt Apr 3 '13 at 13:24

I don't know if will be faster, but this regular expression might satisfy you:

couplet = re.compile(r'(.).*\1')
result_strings = [s if not re.search(couplet, s) for s in candidate_strings]
share|improve this answer
    
Nice try, but actually slower. –  Bengt Apr 2 '13 at 1:44

You could sort the string and iterate it to see if there are no consecutive same letters, but this is N*log(N) so I'm not sure this will be faster than the set solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Iterating over string is an O(N) solution, so it won't be faster for large strings. –  J0HN Apr 1 '13 at 20:18
    
But at each character you'd still have to compare against all the previous characters in some way. I'm certainly not convinced it's O(N) like you say. The sorting's certainly interesting, though similar in approach to the set. It has the nice benefit of early termination, though. –  Dan Lecocq Apr 1 '13 at 20:21
    
See unique_chars_sort(s) in voithus' answer for a solution that sorts and looks for consecutive same letters. This is two times slower than the fastest solution. –  Bengt Apr 2 '13 at 1:48

See bucket sort although it a sorting algorithm you can base your solution in that, basically you define an array of n positions and for each char you place it in the array on position given by its ASCII or UNICODE value (see below for unicode), you will have O(n) time complexity in each iteration at most (you can break when a position in the array is already used) ... but I think you won't find a considerable difference in either method given that you can simply check at first if(string.length < 255) or whatever is the number of possible valid values in the string.

That check ensures that any loop will be at most over 255 characters, which make them small small enough to have worries about performance in most cases

(I don't know python, but I'm sure there is some string.length property or equivalent)

As mentioned by @JOHN, if you need to support a large or all possible string values then this will cause problems with both space and time

share|improve this answer
    
Aware of unicode? :) Read this –  J0HN Apr 1 '13 at 20:24
    
absolutely, if support for all possible unicode characters is required then different considerations should be taken. It is not a common scenario to have to support ALL possible unicode characters –  jorgehmv Apr 1 '13 at 20:28
    
Well, you can't support only some unicode chars. It's all or nothing. :) –  J0HN Apr 1 '13 at 20:40
    
@J0HN: Welp, technically the code points for ASCII are also valid UTF-8 code points. So, I could argue that by supporting ASCII I am supporting a "limited subset" of Unicode. :o) –  voithos Apr 1 '13 at 20:48
    
@voithos ага, конечно :) This were some symbols from a subset of unicode. Lucky for you, SO uses UTF to process it, so you see it just as I do. However, if it support only "limited subset" of unicode (as you labeled ASCII) you'll get a bunch of non-readable characters that happen to be at the same code points in your machine locale. So, you won't get consistent results. I wouldn't call it "supporting" :) –  J0HN Apr 1 '13 at 20:59

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