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I have a script that hijacks all links with a certain REL tag and it will update the main content area for the JS version of my site. The problem is when I had it in its own JS file the pages loaded up in the content frame (div) would not execute the code even if it had a matching REL. I attached the script into those pages and a bug occurred that would make this script execute as many times as this script was found. So if I went through 3 pages of content link clicks would execute this 3 times. 5 pages would equal 5 executions. Spent half a day on this and would really like to know what I could do better.

Here is a snippet of what I am trying to use to hijack the links.

$("a[rel='linkMain']").click(function() {

    var link = $(this).attr("href");
    priFrame(link, 'main', 'true');
    return false;

});

Here is a snippet of my priFrame so you know how I am trying to load the data.

function priFrame(page, frame){

        $('#'+frame+'frame').load('/'+page).hide(0).scrollTop(0).fadeIn(1000);
        $("html, body").animate({ scrollTop: 0 }, 600);
        window.history.pushState(null, page, page);

}
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Only load the js file once, and use event delegation to bind the event. –  Kevin B Apr 1 '13 at 20:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a good case for event delegation. Try this instead (note: this script should be included once for the entire page, not for each page that is dynamically navigated to):

$(document).on("click", "a[rel='linkMain']", function() {
    var link = $(this).attr("href");
    priFrame(link, 'main', 'true');
    return false;
});

The reason for the behavior you were seeing before is as follows:

When you simply had the script on the page once, it would bind click handlers to all the a[rel='linkMain'] elements that were already present on the page. Once you had dynamically brought new a[rel='linkMain'] elements onto the page, however, those new elements were not bound as well.

When you put the code into each page that was loaded dynamically, you were binding new handlers to a[rel='linkMain'] elements that had already had click event handlers bound to them previously.

The event delegation works because the click handler is only bound to the document once. Whenever a click event occurs, we simply make sure that the event originated from a a[rel='linkMain'] element, and then trigger the handler. This allows us to dynamically add/remove elements from the page without having to keep taps on which a[rel='linkMain'] elements do/don't have event handlers bound to them already.

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Works perfect. Appreciate the details. Thanks. –  burritodemon Apr 1 '13 at 20:35

@jmarr beat me to it :P

$("body").on('click', "a[rel='linkMain']", function() {

    var link = $(this).attr("href");
    priFrame(link, 'main', 'true');
    return false;

});
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