Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I have researched a lot, mostly in SO, about setTimeout being "not blocking", and so being not suitable to be used inside a for loop, since the loop keeps going on and one while the function calls keep building up.

I have an HTML file which documents an image processing algorithm, so I want to display the active pixels "walking" in a "human-readable" speed. The implementation I tried and does not work is the following:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8">
</head>

<body onload="run();">

    <canvas id="Canvas" width=501 height=601></canvas>

    <script>

        function run() {
            reevaluate();
        };

        var fixedcenteri;
        var fixedcenterj;



        function reevaluate() {

            var altura_imagem = 50;
            var largura_imagem = 40;

            for (var i = 0; i < altura_imagem; i++) {
                for (var j = 0; j < largura_imagem; j++) {

                    fixedcenteri = i;
                    fixedcenterj = j;

                    setTimeout(draw, 100);


                    // if I uncomment this I can see what I want, but...
                    // alert(i+j);
                };
            };
        };


        function draw () {
            var elem = document.getElementById('Canvas');
            var cx = elem.getContext('2d');

            w = elem.width;
            h = elem.height;

            cx.fillStyle = "white";
            cx.fillRect(0,0,w,h);

            cx.fillStyle = 'blue';
            cx.fillRect(fixedcenteri, fixedcenterj, 10, 10);
        }

    </script>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by apsillers, Trott, Jean, Stony, Blachshma Apr 2 '13 at 8:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Why not put the contents of the loop in a function that is called in the timeout, passing the appropriate values for i and j as parameters? –  jonhopkins Apr 1 '13 at 20:30
    
@jonhopkins That would be another way to do it, surely, but I think it would be a matter of preference, and probably is not related to my actual problem. –  heltonbiker Apr 1 '13 at 20:35
    
@apsillers actually I think the problem is not solved there (at least that would not solve my problem), because I need each call to the function draw to complete BEFORE the loop continues. My code, and the answers to the linked question, seem to be building up function calls during the while loop, and executing them "all together" after some timeout. :o( –  heltonbiker Apr 1 '13 at 20:46
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think this does what you are looking for.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8">
</head>

<body onload="draw();">

    <canvas id="Canvas" width=501 height=601></canvas>

    <script>

        var fixedcenteri = 0;
        var fixedcenterj = 0;

        function draw () {
            var elem = document.getElementById('Canvas');
            var cx = elem.getContext('2d');

            w = elem.width;
            h = elem.height;

            cx.fillStyle = "white";
            cx.fillRect(0,0,w,h);

            cx.fillStyle = 'blue';
            cx.fillRect(fixedcenteri, fixedcenterj, 10, 10);

            if(fixedcenteri < 50) {
                if(fixedcenterj < 40) {
                    fixedcenterj++;
                } else {
                    fixedcenterj = 0;
                    fixedcenteri++;
                }
                setTimeout(draw, 100);
            }
        }

</script>

share|improve this answer
    
I accepted this one, as it keeps the interval, modifies very little my original code, and accounts for loop termination. +1! –  heltonbiker Apr 1 '13 at 21:00
add comment

The easiest implementation would be to store all you draw commands in an array and then process that array using setTimeout to wait between draw commands.

Here's a quick example -> http://jsfiddle.net/K4D84/

//in your initial loop instead of draw
drawCommands.push({i: i, j: j});

Then...

function slowDraw(index) {
    index = index || 0;

    var drawCommand = drawCommands[index];

    if (drawCommand) {
        fixedcenteri = drawCommand.i;
        fixedcenterj = drawCommand.j;
        setTimeout(function () {
            draw();
            slowDraw(++index);
        }, 100);
    }    
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Try RequestAnimationFrame!

RequestAnimationFrame is asynchronous just like setTimeout and it's more efficient than setTimeout.

In addition, it offers animation grouping and auto-stop for off-screen animations.

You can even throttle it to your desired FPS using this technique:

var fps = 15;
function draw() {
    setTimeout(function() {
        requestAnimationFrame(draw);

        // your draw() stuff goes here

    }, 1000 / fps);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.