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I have an issue trying to use the decorator pattern. The constructors are printing out addresses for debugging. Compiled with:

g++ -g -o go Decorator.cpp

My simplified code:

#include <iostream>

class Base
{
public:
    Base()
    {
        std::cout << "Base created - this: " << this << std::endl;
    }
    virtual ~Base() {}
};

class Decorator : public Base
{
public:
    Decorator(const Base & decorated)
    : _decorated(&decorated)
    {
        std::cout << "Decorator created - this: " << this << " created - _decorated is " << _decorated << std::endl;
    }



    ~Decorator()
    {
        std::cout << "Decorator destroyed" << std::endl;
        std::cout << "  This: " << this << ", _decorated: " << _decorated << std::endl;
    }

private:
    const Base * _decorated;
};

class Inside : public Base
{
public:
    Inside()
    {   std::cout << "Inside created - this: " << this << std::endl;   }
};

class Outside : public Decorator
{
public:
    Outside(const Base & decorated)
    : Decorator(decorated)
    {
        std::cout << "Outside created - this: " << this << std::endl;
    }
};

class Group : public Decorator
{
public:
    Group()
    : Decorator(_outside)
    , _outside(_inside)
    {
        std::cout << "Group created - this: " << this << std::endl;
    }

    ~Group()
    {
        std::cout << "Group destroyed" << std::endl;
    }

private:
    Inside  _inside;
    Outside _outside;
};

int main()
{
    std::cout << "Hi there" << std::endl;

    Group g1;

    std::cout << "Done" << std::endl;
}

My problem is in Group::Group(). I believe initializing the Decorator base part of Group with the uninitialized _outside is fine - the only thing Decorator wants is a pointer to the object. My problem is that Decorator(_outside) appears to be calling the copy constructor, which I DON'T want.

gdb goodness:

Breakpoint 1, _fu0___ZSt4cout () at Decorator.cpp:63
63          Group g1;
(gdb) print g1
$1 = {<Decorator> = {<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x77c34e29},
    _decorated = 0x77c34e42}, _inside = warning: can't find linker symbol for vi
rtual table for `Inside' value
{<Base> = {
      _vptr.Base = 0x401a90}, <No data fields>},
  _outside = {<Decorator> = {<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x22ff58},
      _decorated = 0x401af6}, <No data fields>}}

I break prior to g1's constructor and write a couple of _decorated members to known values to help debugging.

(gdb) set g1._decorated = 0
(gdb) set g1._outside._decorated = 0xeeeeeeee
(gdb) print g1
$2 = {<Decorator> = {<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x77c34e29}, _decorated = 0x0},
  _inside = warning: can't find linker symbol for virtual table for `Inside' val
ue
{<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x401a90}, <No data fields>},
  _outside = {<Decorator> = {<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x22ff58},
      _decorated = 0xeeeeeeee}, <No data fields>}}
(gdb) n
Base created - this: 0x22ff34
Inside created - this: 0x22ff34
Base created - this: 0x22ff38
Decorator created - this: 0x22ff38 created - _decorated is 0x22ff34
Outside created - this: 0x22ff38
Group created - this: 0x22ff2c
65          std::cout << "Done" << std::endl;
(gdb) print g1
$3 = {<Decorator> = {<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x4042b8},
    _decorated = 0xeeeeeeee}, _inside = {<Base> = {
      _vptr.Base = 0x4042c8}, <No data fields>},
  _outside = {<Decorator> = {<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x4042d8},
      _decorated = 0x22ff34}, <No data fields>}}

After the constructor, g1._decorated has the uninitialized value of _outside._decorated as its _decorated member, which implies the copy constructor has been called. If I add copy constructor code to class Decorator:

Decorator(const Decorator & that)
{   std::cout << "Copy constructor - this: " << this << " - that: " << &that << std::endl;   }

it does in fact call it.

If I change the second line of the Group constructor from

: Decorator(_outside)

to

: Decorator(static_cast<const Base &>(_outside))

and run gdb

Breakpoint 1, _fu0___ZSt4cout () at Decorator.cpp:63
63          Group g1;
(gdb) print g1
$1 = {<Decorator> = {<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x77c34e29},
    _decorated = 0x77c34e42}, _inside = warning: can't find linker symbol for vi
rtual table for `Inside' value
{<Base> = {
      _vptr.Base = 0x401a90}, <No data fields>},
  _outside = {<Decorator> = {<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x22ff58},
      _decorated = 0x401af6}, <No data fields>}}
(gdb) set g1._decorated = 0
(gdb) set g1._outside._decorated = 0xeeeeeeee
(gdb) print g1
$2 = {<Decorator> = {<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x77c34e29}, _decorated = 0x0},
  _inside = warning: can't find linker symbol for virtual table for `Inside' val
ue
{<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x401a90}, <No data fields>},
  _outside = {<Decorator> = {<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x22ff58},
      _decorated = 0xeeeeeeee}, <No data fields>}}
(gdb) n
Base created - this: 0x22ff2c
Decorator created - this: 0x22ff2c created - _decorated is 0x22ff38
Base created - this: 0x22ff34
Inside created - this: 0x22ff34
Base created - this: 0x22ff38
Decorator created - this: 0x22ff38 created - _decorated is 0x22ff34
Outside created - this: 0x22ff38
Group created - this: 0x22ff2c
65          std::cout << "Done" << std::endl;
(gdb) print g1
$3 = {<Decorator> = {<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x4042b8},
    _decorated = 0x22ff38}, _inside = {<Base> = {
      _vptr.Base = 0x4042c8}, <No data fields>},
  _outside = {<Decorator> = {<Base> = {_vptr.Base = 0x4042d8},
      _decorated = 0x22ff34}, <No data fields>}}

the Decorator copy constructor is NOT called and all appears to be well. I don't like this solution, as it requires every class downstream to remember to do this.

Is there any way to derive Group from Decorator with a member Decorator and NOT call the copy constructor?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

My problem is that Decorator(_outside) appears to be calling the copy constructor, which I DON'T want.

What do you expect it to do?

Decorator has no constructor taking an Outside so the eligible constructors are either:

Decorator(const Base&)

or the implicitly-defined copy constructor:

Decorator(const Decorator&)

The first option involves an implicit conversion from Outside to Base whereas the second involves a conversion from Outside to Decorator, which is a "better" conversion because the Outside to Base conversion "goes through" Decorator to get to Base.

As you discovered, to call the constructor you want you need to do the desired conversion explicitly:

Decorator(static_cast<Base&>(_outside))

This is necessary, because the type you're passing really is a Decorator so of course it prefers the copy constructor.

Another solution is to add a constructor that will be used instead of the copy constructor, e.g. a template, suitably constrained:

template<typename T>
  Decorator(const T& decorated, typename boost::enable_if<boost::is_base_of<T, Base> >* = 0)
  : _decorated(&decorated)
  { }

This will be used for anything which is derived from Base but is not a Base and is not a Decorator

In C++11 you can make it a bit cleaner

template<typename T,
         typename Requires = typename std::enable_if<std::is_base_of<T, Base>::value>>
  Decorator(const T& decorated)
  : _decorated(&decorated)
  { }
share|improve this answer
    
I expected it to "start" at Base and go up, which doesn't make any sense once I read your explanation of "better" conversion :) – bizaff Apr 1 '13 at 21:21

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