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Although I use Observable and Rx in my code from time to time I still have this question in terms of "push model" and its use.

For example, let's say I have this simple code:

  private readonly static List<string> numbers = new List<string>
  {
      "1",
      "2",
      "3",
      "4",
      "5"
  };

  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
      PrintCollection();
      Console.ReadLine();
      numbers.Add("6");
      Console.ReadLine();
  }

  private static void PrintCollection()
  {
      IObservable<string> observable = numbers.ToObservable();
      observable.Subscribe<string>(x => { Console.WriteLine(x); });
  }        

When the program runs only 1-5 will be printed but not 6 unless I use something like an ObservableCollection and hook up the "CollectionChanged" event. However, this makes me wonder what the "push model" really is. I always thought the "push model" meant once the data (colleciton) has subscribed to an event all newly added data to that collection would be subscribed to the same event as well.

Also, most of the examples I've seen using Observable seem to be WPF, view-model-driven implmenentation and I wonder if anyone has used it for any back-end processing and what would be a typical example of that?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you are confusing what ToObservable does - basically, it says "see this set of things? I want to create a new stream that feeds these values back to me." It doesn't "wrap" the source list in any sort of meaningful way such as to listen to future changes, it's more of a snapshot in time - the resulting observable is what that list looked like when the observable was created.

There are numerous ways to model a "live view" of a collection - one you've mentioned: create an ObservableCollection and create the observable from writing into the CollectionChanged event. You can also use a Subject here, although it injects the concept of state into the "stateless" world of rx.

Actually, that's a good point to emphasize: rx streams are far more "functional" in concept than traditional imperative/oo programming; you declare a stream of potential values over time, not a state machine (although you can force it to act like a state machine)...you figure out what the values you want/need "look"over time and that's how you declare your stream.

In a specific case like this, however, declaring a stream of values that vary randomly is difficult; that is better satisfied by other means (eventing, polling, etc).

That said, you could write something like this:

var numbers = new List<string>
{
    "1",
    "2",
    "3",
    "4",
    "5"
};
var source = new ObservableCollection<string>(numbers);
var query = Observable.Create<string>((obs) =>
    {
        foreach(var oldItem in source)
        {
            obs.OnNext(oldItem);
        }
        NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler h;
        h = (o, e) => 
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Collection changed!");
            foreach(var item in e.NewItems)
            {
                obs.OnNext(item as string);
            }
        };
        source.CollectionChanged += h;
        return Disposable.Create (() => source.CollectionChanged -= h);
    });

using(query.Subscribe(Console.WriteLine))
{
    source.Add("6");
    Console.ReadLine();
}

Output:

1
2
3
4
5
Collection changed!
6
share|improve this answer
    
Is there any book or good tutorial to 'get into the head of Observable' ?? –  Jasper Apr 2 '13 at 7:00
1  
@Jasper introtorx.com is a good in-depth tutoral. It's also available in ebook book form. –  Wilka Apr 2 '13 at 10:23
3  
I have written a book/site called IntroToRx.com. I hope that can help you learn. It is also available on Amazon if you are a kindle owner. You may also find this page usefull github.com/LeeCampbell/RxCookbook/blob/master/Model/… (it is the early beginings of the next book) –  Lee Campbell Apr 2 '13 at 11:11
    
Heh - my stock response to that question is to check out Lee's book...so nice of him to do it for me. ;) –  JerKimball Apr 2 '13 at 13:35
    
@LeeCampbell Are you paying attention to that "Lab Alums drinks night" thread at all? –  JerKimball Apr 2 '13 at 14:26

You can Concat Observables together, prior to Subscription:

var numbers = new List<string> { "1", "2", "3", "4", "5" }.ToObservable();
numbers = numbers.Concat(new [] { "6" }.ToObservable());
numbers.Subscribe(n => Console.WriteLine(n), ex => Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString()), () => Console.WriteLine("Completed."));

Output:
1 2 3 4 5 6 Completed.

You can use a Subject and add items after Subscription (here's an example to show when/where things happen):

var subject = new ReplaySubject<string>();
subject.OnNext("7");
subject.Subscribe(n => Console.WriteLine(n), ex => Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString()), () => Console.WriteLine("Completed."));
subject.OnNext("8");
numbers.Subscribe(n => subject.OnNext(n));
subject.OnNext("9");
subject.OnNext("10");

Output: 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 9 10

You also asked if there were examples of using Rx for back-end processing. I'd dare say that's where it's mainly used, but I don't have any hard evidence to back that up. It's definitely not just WPF and has much, much wider applications. It's the ObservableCollection, that is more a WPF thing, I believe, as it's used for data binding and ObservableCollection is not part of Rx.

Hope that helps.

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Interesting example. The line "numbers.Subscribe(n => subject.OnNext(n))" prints every number in "numbers" again, how would you only print out the newly added ones? –  notlkk Apr 2 '13 at 17:45
    
@notlkk In this case, you'd just comment out numbers.Subscribe(n => subject.OnNext(n));. In more complex situations, where you want to subscribe multiple times to the same subject, then you must use various combinations of BehaviourSubject, ReplaySubject, Publish, and Defer, to manage different sorts of behavior. But that's a separate question. ;) –  Richard Hein Apr 2 '13 at 18:23
    
I'm sorry I didn't make the quesiton clear. I meant if I added 7,8 to numbers (not subject) how would I print them (and only them) out? –  notlkk Apr 2 '13 at 19:08
    
giggle Rx is not magic. As List<T> does not expose any notification system for when an addition is made, you cant get a notification when you add extra values (via Rx or any other mechanism). –  Lee Campbell Apr 2 '13 at 19:54

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