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I'm trying to understand the assembly code of the C function. I could not understand why andl -16 is done at the main. Is it for allocating space for the local variables. If so why subl 32 is done for main.

I could not understand the disassembly of the func1. As read the stack grows from higher order address to low order address for 8086 processors. So here why is the access on positive side of the ebp(for parameters offset) and why not in the negative side of ebp. The local variables inside the func1 is 3 + return address + saved registers - So it has to be 20, but why is it 24? (subl $24,esp)

#include<stdio.h>
int add(int a, int b){
 int res = 0;
 res = a + b;
 return res;
}
int func1(int a){
 int s1,s2,s3;
 s1 = add(a,a);
 s2 = add(s1,a);
 s3 = add(s1,s2);
 return s3;
}
int main(){
 int a,b;
 a = 1;b = 2;
 b = func1(a);
 printf("\n a : %d b : %d \n",a,b);
 return 0;
}

assembly code :

       .file   "sample.c"
        .text
.globl add
        .type   add, @function
add:
        pushl   %ebp
        movl    %esp, %ebp
        subl    $16, %esp
        movl    $0, -4(%ebp)
        movl    12(%ebp), %eax
        movl    8(%ebp), %edx
        leal    (%edx,%eax), %eax
        movl    %eax, -4(%ebp)
        movl    -4(%ebp), %eax
        leave
        ret
        .size   add, .-add
.globl func1
        .type   func1, @function
func1:
        pushl   %ebp
        movl    %esp, %ebp
        subl    $24, %esp
        movl    8(%ebp), %eax
        movl    %eax, 4(%esp)
        movl    8(%ebp), %eax
        movl    %eax, (%esp)
        call    add
        movl    %eax, -4(%ebp)
        movl    8(%ebp), %eax
        movl    %eax, 4(%esp)
        movl    -4(%ebp), %eax
        movl    %eax, (%esp)
        call    add
        movl    %eax, -8(%ebp)
        movl    -8(%ebp), %eax
        movl    %eax, 4(%esp)
        movl    -4(%ebp), %eax
        movl    %eax, (%esp)
                                      call    add
        movl    %eax, -12(%ebp)
        movl    -12(%ebp), %eax
        leave
        ret
        .size   func1, .-func1
        .section        .rodata
.LC0:
        .string "\n a : %d b : %d \n"
        .text
.globl main
        .type   main, @function
main:
        pushl   %ebp
        movl    %esp, %ebp
        andl    $-16, %esp
        subl    $32, %esp
        movl    $1, 28(%esp)
        movl    $2, 24(%esp)
        movl    28(%esp), %eax
        movl    %eax, (%esp)
        call    func1
        movl    %eax, 24(%esp)
        movl    $.LC0, %eax
        movl    24(%esp), %edx
        movl    %edx, 8(%esp)
        movl    28(%esp), %edx
        movl    %edx, 4(%esp)
        movl    %eax, (%esp)
        call    printf
        movl    $0, %eax
        leave
        ret
        .size   main, .-main
        .ident  "GCC: (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.4.4-14ubuntu5) 4.4.5"
        .section        .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The andl $-16, %esp aligns the stack pointer to a multiple of 16 bytes, by clearing the low four bits.

The only places where positive offsets are used with (%ebp) are parameter accesses.

You did not state what your target platform is or what switches you used to compile with. The assembly code shows some Ubuntu identifier has been inserted, but I am not familiar with the ABI it uses, beyond that it is probably similar to ABIs generally used with the Intel x86 architecture. So I am going to guess that the ABI requires 8-byte alignment at routine calls, and so the compiler makes the stack frame of func1 24 bytes instead of 20 so that 8-byte alignment is maintained.

I will further guess that the compiler aligned the stack to 16 bytes at the start of main as a sort of “preference” in the compiler, in case it uses SSE instructions that prefer 16-byte alignment, or other operations that prefer 16-byte alignment.

So, we have:

In main, the andl $-16, %esp aligns the stack to a multiple of 16 bytes as a compiler preference. Inside main, 28(%esp) and 24(%esp) refer to temporary values the compiler saves on the stack, while 8(%esp), 4(%esp), and (%esp) are used to pass parameters to func1 and printf. We see from the fact that the assembly code calls printf but it is commented out in your code that you have pasted C source code that is different from the C source code used to generate the assembly code: This is not the correct assembly code generated from the C source code.

In func1, 24 bytes are allocated on the stack instead of 20 to maintain 8-byte alignment. Inside func1, parameters are accessed through 8(%ebp) and 4(%ebp). Locations from -12(%ebp) to -4(%ebp) are used to hold values of your variables. 4(%esp) and (%esp) are used to pass parameters to add.

Here is the stack frame of func1:

    - 4(%ebp) = 20(%esp): s1.
    - 8(%ebp) = 16(%esp): s2.
    -12(%ebp) = 12(%esp): s3.
    -16(%ebp) =  8(%esp): Unused padding.
    -20(%ebp) =  4(%esp): Passes second parameter of add.
    -24(%ebp) =  0(%esp): Passes first parameter of add.
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2  
This quote from the gcc manual may be helpful: -mpreferred-stack-boundary=num : Attempt to keep the stack boundary aligned to a 2 raised to num byte boundary. If -mpreferred-stack-boundary is not specified, the default is 4 (16 bytes or 128 bits). –  teppic Apr 2 '13 at 0:05
    
Thanks for expalining the 8 byte alignment. My doubt is in add - > 1(local variable) + return address => 2 * 8 = 16 which holds correct. But in func1 -> 3(local variables) + return address = > 4 * 8 = 32 should be there . why is it 24. why in the main subl 32 is done for the base pointer. I'm a bit confused with the calculations made. –  Angus Apr 2 '13 at 0:19
1  
@Angus: In calculating the func1 size, why do you multiply by 8? In this 32-bit architecture, the int objects in func1 and address are each four bytes. func1 uses four bytes for s1, four bytes for s2, four bytes for s3, eight bytes two pass two parameters to add, and four more bytes to pad for alignment. That is 24 bytes. –  Eric Postpischil Apr 2 '13 at 0:27
    
Thanks eric. I understoog now. –  Angus Apr 2 '13 at 0:30
1  
@Angus: The low four bits of %esp have some value from zero to 15. The andl $-16, %esp clears those bits, reducing %esp to a multiple of 16. If %esp was already a multiple of 16, it does not change. Because you do not know in advance how much %esp will be reduced, you cannot count on any of those bytes for a stack frame. They are only for padding and remain unused. So you must subtract 32 from %esp to get the bytes you need. –  Eric Postpischil Apr 2 '13 at 1:01

I would suggest working through this with the output of objdump -S which will give you interlisting with the C source.

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