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I am trying to send a word over to an Arduino running as a server, from a WPF C# application. Every now and again the complete work is not sent.

C# Code

public void send(String message)
{
    TcpClient tcpclnt = new TcpClient();
    ConState.Content = "Connecting.....";
    try
    {
        tcpclnt.Connect("192.168.0.177", 23);
        ConState.Content = "Connected";

        String str = message;
        Stream stm = tcpclnt.GetStream();

        ASCIIEncoding asen = new ASCIIEncoding();
        byte[] ba = asen.GetBytes(str);

        stm.Write(ba, 0, ba.Length);

        tcpclnt.Close();

    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        ConState.Content = "Not Connected";
        return;
    }
}

How it is sent to the method:

String mes = "back;";
send(mes);

Arduino code:

if (client.available() > 0) {
    // Read the bytes incoming from the client:
    char thisChar = client.read();

    if (thisChar == ';')
    {
        //Add a space
        Serial.println("");
    }
    else {
        //Print because it's not a space
        Serial.write(thisChar);
    }
}

The Arduino is using the chat server example. I am sending "back;" and "forward;" across. The results on the serial monitor:

back
forwaback
forward
back
forwaforwar
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1  
it's kind of hard to tell what's going on.. does the Stream having anything to do with it...? you really should show the full code block.. –  MethodMan Apr 2 '13 at 0:57
    
The full code block? after that its just catching the exception. –  user2234135 Apr 2 '13 at 1:04
    
are you Freeing the Stream by the way it looks currently you have `potential memory leak issues –  MethodMan Apr 2 '13 at 1:06
    
I'm afraid I have no idea what you mean Freeing the Stream –  user2234135 Apr 2 '13 at 1:08
    
It would be useful to see how forward; and back; gets to the stream exactly. –  angelatlarge Apr 2 '13 at 1:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem seems to be with this code:

if (client.available() > 0) {

  // read the bytes incoming from the client:
  char thisChar = client.read();

  ...
}

What it does is:

  • Check if we have received data from the client
  • Read a single byte from the client buffer
  • Exit, and go on to do other things

As the OP pointed out, this comes direct from Arduino chat server example. In that example, this working correctly in loop() depends on the alreadyConnected flag being set right after a new connection is made: if it isn't, then the buffer is flushed before any data is read. That's one possible landmine.


Nonetheless, there is no reason to change the if block to be a while loop in the OP's case so, in other words instead of

if (client.available() > 0) {

have

while (client.available() > 0) {

The only reason to have an if statement there is to make sure that you frequently do other processing in loop() if you have clients that send a lot of data: If the reading of client data is done from inside a while this loop will not exit until the there is no more data from the client. Since this doesn't seem to be an issue in the asked-about case, the if to while change makes sense.

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