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The following code does not produce a file (I can't see the file anywhere). What is missing?

try
{
    //create a temporary file
    String timeLog = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyyMMdd_HHmmss").format(
        Calendar.getInstance().getTime());
    File logFile=new File(timeLog);

    BufferedWriter writer = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(logFile));
    writer.write (string);

    //Close writer
    writer.close();
} catch(Exception e)
{
    e.printStackTrace();
}
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Are you sure that you're looking in the right place? Are you looking in the user directory? i.e., the path returned by System.out.println(logFile.getCanonicalPath()) –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 2 '13 at 1:17
1  
1- Try calling writer.flush() before you close it. 2- You should be using a finally block to ensure that the Writer is closed even if there is an exception –  MadProgrammer Apr 2 '13 at 1:17
1  
@user717630 Not really. Without the path, the file will be written the current "working" directory, which is typically the directory the program was executed in... –  MadProgrammer Apr 2 '13 at 1:19
2  
Try adding System.out.println(logFile.getCanonicalPath()); just before you create the writer, this will tell you where the file is been written to. –  MadProgrammer Apr 2 '13 at 1:21
1  
@HovercraftFullOfEels By now, it all looks awfully familiar :P –  MadProgrammer Apr 2 '13 at 1:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 22 down vote accepted

I think your expectations and reality don't match (but when do they ever ;))

Basically, where you think the file is written and where the file is actually written are not equal (hmmm, perhaps I should write an if statement ;))

public class TestWriteFile {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        BufferedWriter writer = null;
        try {
            //create a temporary file
            String timeLog = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyyMMdd_HHmmss").format(Calendar.getInstance().getTime());
            File logFile = new File(timeLog);

            // This will output the full path where the file will be written to...
            System.out.println(logFile.getCanonicalPath());

            writer = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(logFile));
            writer.write("Hello world!");
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            try {
                // Close the writer regardless of what happens...
                writer.close();
            } catch (Exception e) {
            }
        }
    }
}

Also note that your example will override any existing files. If you want to append the text to the file you should do the following instead:

writer = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(logFile, true));
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1  
Shouldn't the last part be: writer = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(logFile,true)); ?? Since the append parameter is for FileWriter not BufferedWriter. –  third_eye Sep 18 '13 at 22:59
    
@third_eye You're spoiling my fun ;) Nice catch, I've updated the answer –  MadProgrammer Sep 18 '13 at 23:37

I would like to add a bit more to MadProgrammer's Answer.

In case of multiple line writing, when executing the command

writer.write(string);

one may notice that the newline characters are omitted or skipped in the written file even though they appear during debugging or if the same text is printed onto the terminal with,

System.out.println("\n");

Thus, the whole text comes as one big chunk of text which is undesirable in most cases. The newline character can be dependent on the platform, so it is better to get this character from the java system properties using

String newline = System.getProperty("line.separator");

and then using the newline variable instead of "\n". This will get the output in the way you want it.

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In java 7 can now do

try(BufferedWriter w = ....)
{
  w.write(...);
}
catch(IOException)
{
}

and w.close will be done automatically

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+1 for sharing new info –  Kick Buttowski Jun 26 at 15:31

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