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I am trying to find the maximum of the following function for 1 < R < 20. How can I implement this into the code?

The solution is supposed to be R is approx 15.5 or so.

#!/usr/bin/env python
#  Plotting the energy for circular Hohmann transfer

import scipy
import matplotlib
import numpy as np
import pylab


def f(R):
    return 1 / np.sqrt(R) - (np.sqrt(2) * (1 - R)) / (np.sqrt(2) * (1 + R)) - 1

x = np.arange(1, 20)
pylab.plot(x, f(x), 'r')
pylab.show()
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use scipy.optimizie.fmin:

>>> scipy.optimize.fmin(lambda r: -f(r), 10)
Optimization terminated successfully.
         Current function value: -0.134884
         Iterations: 16
         Function evaluations: 32
array([ 11.44451904])

Which is where the maximum actually is:

>>> x = np.linspace(1, 20, 1000)
>>> plt.plot(x, f(x))
[<matplotlib.lines.Line2D object at 0x0000000007BAEF98>]
>>> plt.show()

enter image description here

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I saw the plot and was wary of the max at 15 but that is what the professor wrote. –  dustin Apr 2 '13 at 1:53
    
@Jamie I was given the following error: Traceback (most recent call last): 5 File "./hw7problem5.py", line 14, in <module> 6 scipy.optimize.fmin(lambda r: 1/f(r), 10) 7 AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'optimize' –  dustin Apr 2 '13 at 1:55
1  
@dustin You need to import the optimize module: import scipy.optimize. @Jaime, it would be better to take the opposite of f instead of taking the reciprocal. It doesn't matter in this example, but maximizing f is the same as minimizing -f, not 1/f in general. –  jorgeca Apr 2 '13 at 16:10
    
@jorgeca It had a funny feeling while I was writing it, you are very right indeed, will edit. –  Jaime Apr 2 '13 at 16:25

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