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A question similar to this has been asked before, but I am asking specifically about using composition as an alternative to using module mixins.

class Helper
  def do_somthing
  end
end

If I need to 'use' a class but not inherit it , I would simply compose it and use it.

class MyStuff
  def initialize
    helper = Helper.new
    helper.do_something
  end
end

Why would I like to create a module for this:

 module Helper
   def do_something
   end
 end

class MyStuff
  include Helper
end

The only difference I see is there wont be many Helper objects lying around if I use modules. But I don't see anything with more objects lying around vs less bigger objects.

Moreover, I don't know if I need to subclass it in the future. So how do I decide if the users of my library want to use a module mixin, or would want to use composition?

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1  
require isn't what you need here. You need include. – Linuxios Apr 2 '13 at 2:03
    
thnx. fixed that – codeObserver Apr 2 '13 at 2:19
    
Sure. Glad to help. – Linuxios Apr 2 '13 at 2:20
up vote 8 down vote accepted

When the relationship between Helper and the MyStuff class is one of ownership, use composition. This is known as a "has-a" relationship. For example, let's say you have Person class and a Car class. You would use composition because a person has a car:

class Person
  def initialize
    @car = Car.new
  end
end

class Car
  def accelerate
    # implementation
  end
end

When Helper "acts like" MyStuff, use a module mixin. Helper, in this case, takes on the role of MyStuff. This is a bit different than a "is-a" relationship, which would imply that you should use traditional inheritance. For example, let's say we have a Person class and a Sleeper module. A person takes on the role of a sleeper sometimes, but so do other objects--instances of Dog, Frog, or maybe even Computer. Each of those other classes represent something that can go to sleep.

module Sleeper
  def go_to_sleep
    # implementation
  end
end

class Person
  include Sleeper
end

class Computer
  include Sleeper
end

Sandi Metz's Practical Object-Oriented Design in Ruby is an excellent resource for these topics.

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That is a matter of “Duck Typing”. If you want your class to behave like a Helper, you do include. Whether you are to encapsulate Helper behaviour, the right choice is require.

Mixing Enumerable in, you give your class the huge load of methods by implementing the only each method. Wrapping Array you may hide iteration from others and use it for holding your data only. And vice versa.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you bit explain ? by implementing the only each method – Arup Rakshit Apr 2 '13 at 4:46
    
Your class is to emplement the only one (each) method and mix Enumerable in to yield all the delights of …hhmm …iterationing. – mudasobwa Apr 2 '13 at 4:55
    
my bad! didn't get you – Arup Rakshit Apr 2 '13 at 4:57

Modules mixin is more like multiple inheritance, so follow the usual inheritance vs composition rule — is-a or has-a. By the way, it's include Helper, not require 'Helper'.

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There are a few thing I can share:

  • In case you need to share common behaviours in different classes and modules, you should make it into modules so that later you can just include the modules wherever you like to. It will also help the testing since it's already DRY.

  • In the case of responsibility, you can make it into new modules to make it clear to understand and improve readability of the codebase. It would help to reduce the size of your main classes which should be easy to follow and maintain.

One thing you may notice that include adds functionalities to your instance where extend does to the Class itself.

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