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We are currently in the middle of migrating to an SSH and Kerberos authentication scheme in our unix environment. I need to issue a Kerberos OS command in all our our automated python scripts anytime the script is interrupted, there is an error, or the script executed successfully. I know in bash you can trap on exit, but from my research, there isnt that functionality in python. My attempt is with try/except/else blocks and works, but will not catch direct process kills and issue the command. i am by no means a python expert, so does anyone know a better approach to this or a function to look into? Also, this only works in a simple script where a main function is called, some of my scripts are object oriented and more complex and my approach wont work. Here is my attempt with a simple loop. Any advice?

def main():
    while (True):
        print "Interrupt Me..."

def watchForInterrupts(x):
    #define function to issue kdestroy command
    def issueKdestroy():
        import os
        os.system("kdestroy -q")
        print "issued kdestroy"
    try:
        x()
    except: 
        print "interrupted, issuing kdestroy"
        #call issueKdestroy function if interrupted
        issueKdestroy()
    #else block to issue kdestroy if script completed successfully
    else:
        print "executed successfully, issuing cleanup kdestroy"
        issueKdestroy()

#call watchForInterrupts function with main passed as a parameter 
watchForInterrupts(main)
share|improve this question
    
Look for the finally keyword. It works sorta like in java :) –  Morten Jensen Apr 2 '13 at 2:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Building on another answer, use try...finally and add a signal handler to make sure that finally is called when a SIGQUIT is issued.

import signal
import os
import sys

def callKdestroy():
    print "call kdestroy"

def signal_handler(signum, frame):
    # ensures unwinding of Python execution.
    print "got signal"
    sys.exit(1)

signal.signal(signal.SIGTERM, signal_handler)

try:
    ...
finally:
    callKdestroy()
share|improve this answer

I recommend using finally

def watchForInterrupts(x):
    ...
    try:
        x()
    finally: 
        # Clean up no matter what happens in try part of block
        issueKdestroy()

You can take specific actions for various exceptions if you want

def watchForInterrupts(x):
    ...
    try:
        x()
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        print "User requested termination, cleaning up"
    except SystemExit:
        # You may want to re-raise this
        print "Program terminated abnormally"
    else:
        print "Executed sucessfully"
    finally: 
        # Clean up no matter what happens in try part of block
        issueKdestroy()

You also should avoid except without specifying an exception. For example, if you had a SyntaxError in the called function that would have been caught by the exception handler and you would not be alerted of this.

share|improve this answer
    
i am aware of finally and originally used it, but lets say in the case i issue a cntl^c keyboard interrupt during execution, it is going to catch the exception, issue the kdestroy, then hit the finally block and issue it again. i mean it doesn't hurt issuing twice, but its sloppy. With else, its either raise exception due to error, or else its considered successful and issued the else cleanup kdestroy... also this doesn't address the process kill option. if i issue a kill <pid> command during execution in either option, a kdestroy is not issued. Any other opinions or ideas? –  Vinnie Biros Apr 2 '13 at 3:29
    
Don't call issueKdestroy in the except then? –  root Apr 2 '13 at 4:01
    
@VinnieBiros Notice that the issueHdestroy is only in the finally block, nowhere else, so that it will only be called once. Because I wasn't aware of the PID kill requirement, I didn't handle that in the example. I recommend Alex's answer over mine in that case... it will always do what you want no matter how it exits. –  SethMMorton Apr 2 '13 at 4:55

Try using this module:

http://docs.python.org/2/library/atexit.html

It defines a more convenient way of setting shutdown hooks.

import atexit

@atexit.register
def goodbye():
    print "You are now leaving the Python sector."

Neat, huh?

share|improve this answer
    
atexit callbacks won't be called if you use the default signal handler. –  root Apr 15 '13 at 0:13

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