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I'm trying to convert a byte array to an object. To eliminate any possible problems I created a simple windows form that simply calls the function that is breaking in my original code and I get the same error. Any thoughts as to what is going on?

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        byte[] myArray = new byte[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7};
        object myObject = ByteArrayToObject(myArray);

        if(myObject != null)
        {
            button1.Text = "good";
        }
    }

    private object ByteArrayToObject(byte[] arrBytes)
    {
        System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter binForm = new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();
        MemoryStream memStream = new MemoryStream(arrBytes);
        memStream.Position = 0;
        return binForm.Deserialize(memStream);
    }
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3  
And what makes you think that that particular byte array makes a valid object? –  Jim Mischel Apr 2 '13 at 2:19
    
What would qualify or disqualify a byte array from making a valid object? –  Khaled Boulos Apr 2 '13 at 2:23
1  
Binary serialization does a lot more than just serialize the bytes. It is type safe, it adds metadata to the stream that describes the object. –  Hans Passant Apr 2 '13 at 2:27
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closed as too localized by Hans Passant, Will Apr 2 '13 at 14:32

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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since you don't really say what you are doing with the resulting object, it is hard to give you a more specific answer. However a byte array is already an object:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    byte[] myArray = new byte[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 };
    object myObject = myArray as object;

    if (myObject != null)
    {
        button1.Text = "good";
    }
}
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I just had a library function that required one of its arguments to be an object and I needed to just pass it a bunch of data. I had found the code for converting the Byte Array to an object on the web and being used in a bunch places so I assumed that's the way it's done. –  Khaled Boulos Apr 2 '13 at 2:38
    
@KhaledBoulos If you have a parameter that is an object, you don't need to convert anything...everything is an object. Certainly not serializing it... just call method(myArray) –  Julián Urbano Apr 2 '13 at 2:43
    
@caerolus - true. I used as to demonstrate that it could compile and then possibly fail at run time. In fact the original line was object myObject = myArray; –  chue x Apr 2 '13 at 2:45
    
@chuex I know, I know..that comment was for him! :-) –  Julián Urbano Apr 2 '13 at 2:46
    
@caerolus LOL no worries. –  chue x Apr 2 '13 at 2:47
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The BinaryFormatter does more than simply read/write bytes.

Try this example, where you first serialize and then read the contents of the serialized object:

byte[] myArray = new byte[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 };

System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter binForm = new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();
MemoryStream memStream = new MemoryStream();
// Serialize the array
binForm.Serialize(memStream, myArray);
// Read serialized object
memStream.Position = 0;
byte[] myArrayAgain = new byte[memStream.Length];
memStream.Read(myArrayAgain, 0, myArrayAgain.Length);

Turns out that the serialized content is this:

0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 255, 255, 255, 255, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 15, 1, 0, 0, 0, 7, 0, 0, 0, 2, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11

You see, there is a header and a footer. Your actual object is almost at the end.

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