Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given a test file settings.py, looking like this:

# Django settings for x project.
DEBUG = True
TEMPLATE_DEBUG = DEBUG
ADMINS = (
    # ('Your Name', 'your_email@example.com'),
)
MANAGERS = ADMINS
DATABASES = {
    'default': {
        'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.', # Add 'postgresql_psycopg2', 'postgresql', 'mysql', 'sqlite3' or 'oracle'.
        'NAME': '',                      # Or path to database file if using sqlite3.
        'USER': '',                      # Not used with sqlite3.
        'PASSWORD': '',                  # Not used with sqlite3.
        'HOST': '',                      # Set to empty string for localhost. Not used with sqlite3.
        'PORT': '',                      # Set to empty string for default. Not used with sqlite3.
    }
}
# Hosts/domain names that are valid for this site; required if DEBUG is False
# See https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.3/ref/settings/#allowed-hosts
ALLOWED_HOSTS = []

I would like to programmatically (shell scripting) replace the part between line:

DATABASES = {

and:

}

with some text contained in variable k:

declare -r k='foo bar baz'

I am a perl beginner, but I concocted this:

perl -ne 'if(!$f && /DATABASES/){$f=1} if(!$f){print} if($f && /^}$/){$f=0}' < settings.py

which is a departure from my usual sed/awk little hacks:

# e.g.
sed '/DATABASES/,/^}$/ d' < settings.py

I'd like to improve my perl one-liners!

How can I do what sed does so beautifully in the almighty perl?

What's the absolute best way to:

  • watch stdin pass by and reproduce it to stdout
  • detect a sentinel "stop printing" line and halt copying
  • re-enable pass-through of stdin->stdout upon encountering a 2nd sentinel line

I have omitted the replacement part of the task, hoping to get some help with that as well.

share|improve this question
    
I think sed's /DATABASES/,/^}$/ is rougly th same as /DATABASES/ ... /^}$/ in Perl. –  Brad Gilbert Apr 2 '13 at 18:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I thought I would show you how to convert an awk script to a Perl one.

So to start out, I took Ed Morton's awk version and sent it through a2p.

$ a2p
/DATABASES = {/ { skip=1 }
skip && /^}/    { skip=0; $0=k }
!skip
^d

Note that ^d represents pressing Ctrl + d.

#!/opt/perl-5.14.1/bin/perl
eval 'exec /opt/perl-5.14.1/bin/perl -S $0 ${1+"$@"}'
    if $running_under_some_shell;
            # this emulates #! processing on NIH machines.
            # (remove #! line above if indigestible)

eval '$'.$1.'$2;' while $ARGV[0] =~ /^([A-Za-z_0-9]+=)(.*)/ && shift;
            # process any FOO=bar switches

while (<>) {
    chomp;  # strip record separator
    if (/DATABASES = {/) {
    $skip = 1;
    }
    if ($skip && /^}/) {
    $skip = 0;
    $_ = $k;
    }
    print $_ if !$skip;
}

We can throw out the eval 'exec ... line. I doubt that you would ever need it.

Since we only need to process k="$k", eval '$'.$1.'$2;' ... can be thrown out as well. we just have to either set $k to $ENV{k} or replace the former with the latter. (Note that you will have to call export k for this to work. You could also just call it through env k="$k" perl test.pl)

Since the line gets chomped, we either need to replace print $_ if !$skip; with print $_, "\n" if !$skip; or set $\ to "\n". I think we can just get away without calling chomp.

Also to prevent hard to find mistakes I am going to add use strict; and use warnings; to the beginning.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $skip; # prevents printing when true
while (<>) {
  if (/DATABASES = {/) {
    $skip = 1;
  }
  if ($skip && /^}/) {
    $skip = 0;
    $_ = $ENV{k}."\n";
  }
  print $_ if !$skip;
}

I think we can mix in a sed'ism here. (...)

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

while (<>) {
  if( my $r = /DATABASES = {/ ... /^}/ ){

    if( $r == 1 ){ # first time it matches
      print $ENV{k}, "\n";
    }

    next; # don't print
  }

  print;
}

The only thing is, I think the OP wanted to replace the text between DATABASES = { and }. So we have to add code to allow those two lines to be printed.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

while (<>) {
  if( my $r = /DATABASES = {/ ... /^}/ ){

    if( $r == 1 ){
      # append the replacement to the first line
      $_ .= $ENV{k}."\n";

    }elsif( $r !~ /E/ ){ # rest of the matches, except the last one
      next;
    }
  }

  print;
}

You know, I don't really like having to place the replacement text in an environment variable. How about placing it in the __DATA__ section.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $replacement = do{ local $/; <DATA> }; # slurp
close DATA;

while (<>) {
  if( my $r = /DATABASES = {/ .. /^}/ ){
    if( $r == 1 ){
      $_ .= $replacement;
    }elsif( $r !~ /E/ ){
      next
    }
  }
  print;
}

__DATA__
<<< FOO >>>
share|improve this answer
    
Sh*t man, I should pay you for the learning I am getting here.. for free! Thanks, man! You are so generous with your knowledge.. inspiring! I'd wash your feet in gratitude! (although you may not like that, it's symbolic). How inspiring that you are self-taught too!! –  Robottinosino Apr 2 '13 at 21:40

Can't imagine why you'd want to use perl for simple text manipulation as it's what awk was designed for and, like all good UNIX tools, awk does one thing and does it well.

With GNU awk:

$ k="<<<< foo >>>>"
$ gawk -v k="$k" -v RS='\0' '{sub(/DATABASES = {.*\n}/,k)}1' file
# Django settings for x project.
DEBUG = True
TEMPLATE_DEBUG = DEBUG
ADMINS = (
    # ('Your Name', 'your_email@example.com'),
)
MANAGERS = ADMINS
<<<< foo >>>>
# Hosts/domain names that are valid for this site; required if DEBUG is False
# See https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.3/ref/settings/#allowed-hosts
ALLOWED_HOSTS = []

Explanation:

gawk
-v k="$k"     = set the awk variable k to the value of the shell variable k
-v RS='\0'    = set the Record Separator to the NULL string so gawk reads the whole file
'
{sub(/DATABASES = {.*\n}/,k)}     = replace the text between "DATABASES = {" and "}" at the start of a line inclusive with the contents of the awk variable k.
1     = set a true condition which invokes the default action of printing the current record (the whole file in this case)
' file

If you can't read the whole file at one time due to a memory constraint or if you just prefer this style or don't have GNU awk, modify the script to (untested):

$ awk -v k="$k" '
    /DATABASES = {/ { skip=1 }
    skip && /^}/    { skip=0; $0=k }
    !skip
  ' file

Hopefully what it does is obvious. Note that removing the setting of RS='\0' means the script is no longer gawk-specific.

If you need to keep the delimiting lines, that's just a tweak too:

$ awk -v k="$k" '
    skip && /^}/    { skip=0; print k }
    !skip
    /DATABASES = {/ { skip=1 }
  ' file
# Django settings for x project.
DEBUG = True
TEMPLATE_DEBUG = DEBUG
ADMINS = (
    # ('Your Name', 'your_email@example.com'),
)
MANAGERS = ADMINS
DATABASES = {
<<<< foo >>>>
}
# Hosts/domain names that are valid for this site; required if DEBUG is False
# See https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.3/ref/settings/#allowed-hosts
ALLOWED_HOSTS = []
share|improve this answer
    
As a matter of fact, I love sed and awk! Thanks a lot for you answer!! Answer: only because I am learning perl, I still prefer sed/awk for these things! –  Robottinosino Apr 2 '13 at 14:28
    
Could you kindly "explain"/"expand" your one-liner? It is customary, when a nice and compact solution is offered, to add a "reading guide" to it, for the uninitiated, or the ones (like me) less skilled than you. –  Robottinosino Apr 2 '13 at 14:31
    
The point is though, if you want to learn perl you should first learn what it's good for (I don't know what that is but I'm sure there's something). Just "learning perl" sounds like the people who "learn sed" by coming up with all sorts of convoluted scripts containing arcane combinations of punctuation marks and single characters to do things that you CAN do in sed but simply should not. –  Ed Morton Apr 2 '13 at 14:33
    
@Robottinosino - explanation added. –  Ed Morton Apr 2 '13 at 14:38
    
I now admire your awk solution even more. It does have, unnecessarily if I am not mistaken, a totally different memory requirement than line-based filtering: are you not, perchance, gobbling up the whole text file just to regex substitute? I ask because the pattern does not lend itself to be scanned with a buffer (i.e. think about it: I can't know whether I will encounter a closing brace until the whole file potentially has been read). This to me is a fundamental difference is scanning style: string-based regex Vs line scanning with a flag set and unset based on encountering a sentinel... –  Robottinosino Apr 2 '13 at 16:25

To remove the part between DATABASES and }, you can use this:

perl -ne 'print unless (/DATABASES/../^}$/)' settings.py

For the replacement, something like this:

$ export VAR="foo bar baz"
$ perl -ne 'print $ENV{VAR},"\n" if /DATABASES/; print unless /DATABASES/../^}$/' settings.py
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks.. how would you do the replacement, though? –  Robottinosino Apr 2 '13 at 2:37
    
Just print what you want if you see the first line of what you want to replace: perl -ne 'print "$ENV{VAR}\n" if /DATABASES/; print unless /DATABASES/../^}$/' settings.py –  aragaer Apr 2 '13 at 6:15
    
@aragaer : thanks mate, nice solution, updated it... my solution was looking funny once i saw yours :) –  Guru Apr 2 '13 at 7:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.