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The push method is used when it is called in the main function. However, even if the argument in the main function is a pointer, it still uses the function void Push(const DATA_TYPE& newValue).

Shouldn't it use the other one since that is the one accepting the pointer? How do I change the arguments in the second function to override the the one if there is a pointer variable?

template<typename DATA_TYPE>   
void Push(const DATA_TYPE& newValue)
{
    //do stuff
}

template<typename DATA_TYPE> 
void Push(const DATA_TYPE *newValue)
{
    //do stuff
}
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Take a look at channel9.msdn.com/Series/C9-Lectures-Stephan-T-Lavavej-Core-C-/… everything is nicely explained. –  Red XIII Apr 2 '13 at 8:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your issue is with the constness.

The issue is that when you call Push(p) with a non-const object pointer, P * p the first version works exactly when setting DATA_TYPE=P*, giving a function signature of Push( const P* & ). In comparison, the second version with DATA_TYPE=Prequires the addition of const to the type signature to get Push( const P* ). This means the first version is selected instead of the second, since it is an exact match.

Here's an example to clarify what is going on:

Here's an example:

#include <iostream>

class Foo
{
    public:
    template<typename DT>   
    void Push(const DT& newValue)
    {
        std::cout<<"In const DT& version"<<std::endl;
    }

    template<typename DT>
    void Push(const DT *newValue)
    {
        std::cout<<"In const DT* version"<<std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Foo f;

    int i=7;

    // Since i is not const we pickup the wrong version
    f.Push( i ); // const DT&  ( DT = int )
    f.Push( &i ); // const DT& ( DT = int* )

    // Here's using a const pointer to show it does the right things
    const int * const_i_ptr = &i;
    f.Push( const_i_ptr ); // const DT* ( DT = int );

    // Now using a const object everything behaves as expected
    const int i_const = 7;
    f.Push( i_const ); // const DT& ( DT = int );
    f.Push( &i_const ); // const DT*  (DT = int );
}
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You might have clarified that this means the reference version provides an exact match, but he pointer version still requires a type conversion from non-const to const pointer, so the reference version is a better match. –  Keith Apr 2 '13 at 2:51
    
@Keith I agree, hopefully I've addressed that sufficiently now. –  Michael Anderson Apr 2 '13 at 3:03

I've tested this program

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
void push(T&)
{
    std::cout << "By ref" << std::endl;
}

template <typename T>
void push(T*)
{
    std::cout << "By ptr" << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    int x = 0;
    push(x);
    push(&x);
    return 0;
}

It outputs

By ref
By ptr
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1  
The difference here is the the template <typename T> void push(T*) is a template, where void Push(const DATA_TYPE *newValue) is not. I don't see how this is relevant to the question. –  Mankarse Apr 2 '13 at 2:38
    
did you try with const? –  gansai Apr 2 '13 at 2:40
    
Your missing const. &x is an rvalue and cannot be bound to non-const ref. –  Jesse Good Apr 2 '13 at 2:41
    
Sorry. I was wrong. –  neuront Apr 2 '13 at 2:43

It is because const DATA_TYPE& newValue will match pretty much anything, in your case it matches as reference to pointer const DATA_TYPE*& newValue. Try using std::remove_pointer described here - from the top of my head i would write:

template<typename DATA_TYPE>   
void Push(const typename std::remove_pointer<DATA_TYPE>::type& newValue)
{
    //do stuff
}

template<typename DATA_TYPE> 
void Push(const DATA_TYPE *newValue)
{
    //do stuff
}

Nothe however that writing templates matching const T& along with other template overloads will usually cause const T& grab every call, so you should avoid doing things this way.

EDIT :

My previous code is not correct, it must be a bit more complex:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template<typename DATA_TYPE, bool is_pointer>
struct helper;

template<typename DATA_TYPE>
struct helper<DATA_TYPE, true>{
    static void f(const typename std::remove_pointer<DATA_TYPE>::type*){
        std::cout << "Pointer" << std::endl;
    }
};

template<typename DATA_TYPE>
struct helper<DATA_TYPE, false>{
    static void f(const DATA_TYPE&){
        std::cout << "Non-pointer" << std::endl;
    }
};

template<typename DATA_TYPE>
void Push(const DATA_TYPE& newValue)
{
    helper<DATA_TYPE, std::is_pointer<DATA_TYPE>::value >::f(newValue);
}

int main()
{
    int i=0;
    Push(i);
    Push(&i);
    return 0;
}

This works as expected and it doesn't force the caller to use proper const-ness, although I admit it's not as glamorous as my previous solution ;)

share|improve this answer
    
It seems you can't do argument type deduction in that way: ideone.com/Ift1s0 –  Michael Anderson Apr 2 '13 at 3:09
    
@MichaelAnderson See my edit... –  j_kubik Apr 3 '13 at 10:17
    
Haven't tried it but that looks a lot more promising. –  Michael Anderson Apr 4 '13 at 0:09

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