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I would like to get some input on some ways to handle long computational tasks within a java web framework and how to callback to a browser client.

I have come accross JBoss remoting, and Spring remoting.

Want to be able to have the client send a request for processing. Processing can take X time, and once complete responds to the client.

Any pros and cons and suggestions welcome.

Thanks.

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what should the browser show while the task is being computed? –  zhong.j.yu Apr 2 '13 at 3:16
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are several ways this might be accomplished:

  • Utilize Servlet 3.0 with an AsyncTask.
  • Incorporate a Comet implementation with either long-polling by your UI, or server push.
  • Build your UI with HTML5, and utilize WebSockets (least portable solution).

Both JBoss and Spring Remoting might also be viable solutions, but they really were built for different purposes.

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I will take a look at the AsyncTask you mentioned and support in Grails. thanks. –  phil.e.b Apr 2 '13 at 16:32
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Executing a long computational task and server push for web applications are two separate things, really.

As mentioned, web applications using comet will allow the server push (which is a term for when a Web Server can push updates to a browser without the browser initiating a request). There are frameworks which build on top of this. ICEfaces, Primefaces and ZK are three web application frameworks which support this. Flex has its own support for pushing data from the service layer as well.

The async executions could be anything as simple as a thread spawned off that runs and has enough information to start the server push process back to the client. You could also use message-based solutions to handle the async execution of the long process.

There are a lot of options out there, and it really comes down to what tools/frameworks you're currently using and find a good fit.

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