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I was playing around with this function:

public class x {

public static void main(String[] args) {
recurse(10);
}

public static int recurse(int theNumber) {

    if(theNumber == 0) {
        return 0;
    }

    else
    {
        System.out.println(theNumber);
        theNumber--;
        recurse(theNumber);
        System.out.println(theNumber);
    }

    return -1;
}
}

and I got this output:

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Press any key to continue . . .

How is this possible? I understand where the countdown from 10 to 0 comes from.. but how on earth does it count back up?? I'm quite certain I'm missing a fundamental concept about recursion. Can someone fill in the blanks??

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7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Habib explained it quite well actually. Just make sure you understand that the recursion is followed until the parameter theNumber is zero, hence the recursion terminates, and that this happens before any of the the last Sysout calls is done. Also keep in mind that the variable is not shared but local to each invocation. Visually, it might look like this

recurse(5)
print(5)
recurse(4)
  print(4)
  recurse(3)
    print(3)
    recurse(2)
      print(2)
      recurse(1)
         print(1)
         recurse(0)
         print(0)
      print(1)
    print(2)
  print(3)
print(4)  

Calls that are in the same column belong to the same stackframe, i.e. same method invocation. Notice, how you decent in the call hierarchy before you actually reach the first print statement after the recursive invocation. This should make it clear, to you.

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"Also keep in mind that the variable is not shared but local to each invocation." - this might be the kicker that i'm missing –  user Apr 2 '13 at 7:21
    
Yeah, maybe. I know that this is kind of confusing in the beginning. One gets used to thinking in stack frames after a while :) It's like becoming a robot. Please upvote. –  bennidi Apr 2 '13 at 7:29

That is because of the last System.out.println(theNumber); in your method. After recursively calling the method, and upcon completion of the method it is printing those values.

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I understand that it is because of the last System.out.println(theNumber). I'm not understanding the flow. Is the recursive call completed, then the 2nd System.out.prinln(theNumber) call visited? I just don't understand the flow of this... –  user Apr 2 '13 at 7:05
    
It never reaches the call until after it has converged. So in other words you will enter a call to recurse without printing anything. Then after the last recursive call the stack frames unwind. –  Chief Two Pencils Apr 2 '13 at 7:06
    
Could you explain how the method executes in a step-by-step manner? –  user Apr 2 '13 at 7:06
    
@user, I would suggest you to dry run the program with a smaller value , actually it is not call the last println statement untill the number reaches 0, then from that it executes rest of the method cals. But try it on paper first –  Habib Apr 2 '13 at 7:09
4  
@user: Why don't you step thorough your program using a debugger? This would be much more enlightening than reading some comments. –  A.H. Apr 2 '13 at 7:10

For brevity, let's say you call recurse(2) in your main program. Then you have:

theNumber = 2 prints 2, decrements, calls recurse(1)

--> theNumber = 1, prints 1, decrements, calls recurse(0)

----> theNumber = 0, returns without printing

--> theNumber = 1 prints 0 (decremented from 1), returns

theNumber = 2 prints 1 (decremented from 2), returns

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1  
i understand everything up until theNumber=0, returns without printing. after that, shouldn't the function quit?? –  user Apr 2 '13 at 7:20
    
say method A looks like this: statement0; statement1; methodB(); statement3; In the general case, when methodB returns, execution will resume in methodA at statement3, even if methodB == methodA (i.e. you call the method that you are in). Try doing a search for what the call stack and a program counter are. –  croyd Apr 2 '13 at 7:27
    
@user Why should it? Recursive methods are executed exactly like any other methods. Hence there is no "early quit". –  A.H. Apr 2 '13 at 7:27

This is what you need-

public static int recurse(int theNumber) {

    System.out.println(theNumber);
    if (theNumber > 0) {
        theNumber--;
        recurse(theNumber);
    }

    return 0;
}
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Your last System.out.println(theNumber) is the reason of it. As you were asking about the Flow. First the recursive call is completed and then it's making BackTracking. Check this Link BackTracking

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As Habib said flow goes into recursion and then after completion of executing recursive function your last System.out.println(theNumber) gets called.

---->  public static int recurse(int theNumber) {
|   
|       if(theNumber == 0) {
|           return 0;
|       }
|   
|       else
|       {
|           System.out.println(theNumber);
|           theNumber--;
----------< recurse(theNumber);
            System.out.println(theNumber);
        }

        return -1;
    }

So the time when function returns from recursion theNumber contains the value which was was decremented by 1 only.

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so does it go theNumber--, recurse(9), print, theNumber--, recurse(8), print, etc, etc. how on earth does it get to that last print statement on numerous occasions? –  user Apr 2 '13 at 7:18
    
It goes like print, recurse(9) ; print, recurse(8) ; print, recurse(7).. and after returning from recurse(0) it prints(0) and returns. So print(0) ; print(1) upto first call where theNumber was passed with value 10 –  Sachin Gorade Apr 2 '13 at 7:24

Before your last syso statement you are calling recurse function so it is going on adding your calls on stack..and after reaching value to 0 it is returning to current function back by pulling values from stack.. and after that it is printing values by your last syso statement...

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