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The question came up, when I started implementing asynchronous set and get operations on an object using the concurrent.futures module like this:

import time
from concurrent.futures import ThreadPoolExecutor

executor = ThreadPoolExecutor(max_workers=2)

class Foo(object):
    def set_something(self):
        def long_running_setter():
            time.sleep(1.5)
            print('Set something')
        return executor.submit(long_running_setter)

    def get_something(self):
        def long_running_getter():
            time.sleep(0.5)
            return 'something'
        return executor.submit(long_running_getter)

foo = Foo()
future = foo.get_something()
print("Got " + future.result())

But now, setting a value and waiting for it becomes a little bit awkward to use and semantically "incorrect"

foo.set_something().result()

although I feel it's still valid, because the Foo object is at the lowest level and further abstractions could be built on top of the futures.

So, to sum up my problem:

  • Are futures the right kind of abstractions to get/set values asynchronously from an object? Especially for setters which do not return any value?
  • Should I add a blocking parameter to set_something in order to get rid of the result() call? I have my doubts with this approach, because then I'd encourage not to use futures at all.
  • How would you do it?
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