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In C# if I want to get all elements in a List List1, which don't belong to another List List2 I can do

var result List1.Except(List2);

Is there something equivalent for std::vectors in C++? (C++11 is allowed)

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3  
have a look at set_difference. Alas it only works for sorted containers. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 2 '13 at 7:43
2  
I haven't had to do this in some time, but you can always use remove_if. If they're not sorted I don't know if something better exists... and I must sleep. –  Ed S. Apr 2 '13 at 7:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The following populates List3 with the content from List1 that is not in List2. I hope it is what you're looking for:

std::vector<Type> List1, List2;
//
// populate List1 and List2
//

std::vector<Type> List3;
std::copy_if(List1.begin(), List1.end(), std::back_inserter(List3),
     [&List2](const Type& arg)
     { return (std::find(List2.begin(), List2.end(), arg) == List2.end());});

Alternatively, this is likely better performing, since you don't have to search the entire list to determine lack of existence. Rather you can get an early "hit" and just move to the next node. Note the logic flip in the predicate:

std::vector<Type> List3;
std::remove_copy_if(List1.begin(), List1.end(), std::back_inserter(List3),
     [&List2](const Type& arg)
     { return (std::find(List2.begin(), List2.end(), arg) != List2.end());});
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You need to write your own function something like this:

for each element of List1
{
  auto it = std::find(List2.begin(), List2.end(), element);
  if(it == List2.end())
  {
     result.push_back(element);
  }
}
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You should consider if a std::list is the right data structure for that, as it is - at least in C++ - not sorted by default, so in the worst case you will have to iterate size(list2) times through all elements of the list1, using an algorithm like Asha pointed out.

A better approach would be the use of an ordered container, e.g. multiset and use std::set_difference to create a result.

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For any arbitrary container you can always use the std::remove_if + container::erase combination:

    template <typename Cont, typename FwdIt>
    void subtract(Cont& cont, FwdIt first, FwdIt last) {
        using std::begin; using std::end;
        using const_reference = typename Cont::value_type const&;
        cont.erase(std::remove_if(begin(cont), end(cont),
            [first, last](const_reference value){
                return last != std::find(first, last, value);
             }), end(cont));
    }

    template <typename Cont1, typename Cont2>
    void subtract(Cont1& cont1, Cont2 const& cont2) {
        using std::begin; using std::end;
        subtract(cont1, begin(cont2), end(cont2));
    }

In the case of std::list you can overload the subtract function, because std::list has a dedicated remove_if member function:

    template <typename T, typename Alloc, typename FwdIt>
    void subtract(std::list<T, Alloc>& l, FwdIt first, FwdIt last) {
        l.remove_if([first, last](T const& value){
            return last != std::find(first, last, value);
        });
    }

    template <typename T, typename Alloc, typename Cont>
    void subtract(std::list<T, Alloc>& l, Cont const& cont) {
        using std::begin; using std::end;
        subtract(l, begin(cont), end(cont));

}

These implementation are generic and make no assumption about the sorting of the sequences. If only your second container is guaranteed to be sorted, you can use std::binary_seach instead of find. If both sequences are sorted, you should use std::set_difference.

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