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In short: I try to write something like A <N B for a DSL in Scala, for an integer N and A,B of Type T. Is there a nice possibility to do so?

Longer: I try to write a DSL for TGrep2 in Scala. I'm currently interested to write

A <N B          B is the Nth child of A (the rst child is <1).

in a nice way and as close as possible to the original definition in Scala. Is there a way to overload the < Operator that it can take a N and a B as a argument.

What I tried: I tried two different possibilities which did not make me very happy:

scala> val N = 10
N: Int = 10

scala> case class T(n:String) {def <(i:Int,j:T) = println("huray!")}
defined class T

scala> T("foo").<(N,T("bar"))
huray!

and

scala> case class T(n:String) {def <(i:Int) = new {def apply(j:T) = println("huray!")}}
defined class T

scala> (T("foo")<N)(T("bar"))
warning: there were 1 feature warnings; re-run with -feature for details
huray!
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Id suggest you use something like nth instead of the < symbol which makes the semantics clear. A nth N is B would make a lot of sense to me at least. –  korefn Apr 2 '13 at 7:56
1  
Scala's "operator" syntax sugar allows foo.bar(baz) to become foo bar baz, but it doesn't apply to functions with multiple arguments. You'll want to re-think your DSL so that your statement is more like foo.bar(baz).bang(biff) (A nth N is B) –  Dylan Apr 2 '13 at 11:20
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Id suggest you use something like nth instead of the < symbol which makes the semantics clear. A nth N is B would make a lot of sense to me at least. It would translate to something like

case class T (label:String){
  def is(j:T) = {
label equals j.label
  }
}

case class J(i:List[T]){
  def nth(index:Int) :T = {
    i(index)
  }
}

You can easily do:

val t  = T("Mice")
val t1 = T("Rats")
val j  = J(List(t1,t))

j nth 1 is t //res = true
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The problem is that apply doesn't work as a postfix operator, so you can't write it without the parantheses, you could write this:

  case class T(n: String) {
    def <(in: (Int, T)) = {
      in match {
        case (i, t) =>
          println(s"${t.n} is the ${i} child of ${n}")

      }
    }
  }

  implicit class Param(lower: Int) {
    def apply(t: T) = (lower, t)
  }

but then,

T("foo") < 10 T("bar")

would still fail, but you could work it out with:

T("foo") < 10 (T("bar"))

there isn't a good way of doing what you want without adding parenthesis somewhere.

I think that you might want to go for a combinational parser instead if you really want to stick with this syntax. Or as @korefn proposed, you break the compatibility and do it with new operators.

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