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Suppose I have a dictionary which is dictList = {1:[1,3,4,8], 2:[5,7,2,8], 3:[6,3,5,7]}

I want to print all the combinations like this: key,value first iteration 1,1 2,5 3,6 second iteration 1,1 2,5 3,3 .... and so on

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1  
Do you mean 1,3 2,7 3,3 for the second iteration? –  Kyle Strand Apr 2 '13 at 7:58
    
what is the pattern that governs hat you want to print. explain your question properly. –  IcyFlame Apr 2 '13 at 7:59
    
Don't -1 a guy just because he didn't express his problem properly. It happens to all of us, and it's not lazyness here. @Abudullah: I don't get the combination you want, give more details, and check you didn't make a mistake. –  e-satis Apr 2 '13 at 8:00
1  
Please edit your question to explain what you actually want... –  Kyle Strand Apr 2 '13 at 8:18

3 Answers 3

Assuming that what you're trying to do is retrieve every unique set of three key,value pairs:

from itertools import permutations
# define dictList
# define numkeys to be the number of keys in dictList
# define maxLen to be the number of items in each dict value
perms = permutations(range(maxLen),numKeys)
for p in perms:
    i = 1     # you're indexing your dictionary from 1, not 0
    while i <= numKeys:
        myfunction(i,dictList[i][p[i-1]])   # ...which is why this is awkward
        i += 1
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This will raise an IndexError based on OP's list. –  limelights Apr 2 '13 at 8:04
    
Did you set max to 4? –  Kyle Strand Apr 2 '13 at 8:05
    
No, I haven't run it but I just assumed that it would since you hadn't defined the length of max anywhere :) My english is teh sucks and my previous comment should have been worded differently. –  limelights Apr 2 '13 at 8:07
    
I said "assuming you know that each list in the dictionary has length max." This means that you set max to the length of the lists. –  Kyle Strand Apr 2 '13 at 8:09
    
True, it was sloppy of me, sorry! :) –  limelights Apr 2 '13 at 8:10

Like it has been said, It seems you wrongly explained your problem. But I guess you want something like :

[(1, 1), (2, 5), (3, 6), (1, 3), (2, 7), (3, 3), (1, 4), (2, 2), (3, 5), (1, 8), (2, 8), (3, 7)]

I will try to use zip. For example, zip on your values will associate all first items, all second items, etc.

WARNING : it will only work if your lists have the same length !!! (else you can import itertools.izip_longest to replace zip, the extra index will return None)

>>> zip(*dictList.values())
[(1, 5, 6), (3, 7, 3), (4, 2, 5), (8, 8, 7)]

So the following code :

for t in zip(*dictList.values()):
...    for i, k in enumerate(dictList.keys()):
...       print k, t[i]

Will print :

1 1
2 5
3 6
1 3
2 7
3 3
1 4
2 2
3 5
1 8
2 8
3 7

There is a way to do it in one line :

>>> reduce(lambda cumul, v:cumul + list(zip(dictList.keys(), v)), zip(*dictList.values()), [])
[(1, 1), (2, 5), (3, 6), (1, 3), (2, 7), (3, 3), (1, 4), (2, 2), (3, 5), (1, 8), (2, 8), (3, 7)]

Yes I know, it's not really readable, but I found it funny to try to do this kind of thing in one-line xD Take your time to understand what is happening before using it.

Hope it helps, Have a nice day.

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This solution is slick, but I don't think it's what the OP wants; rather, the set of all possible combinations of values is needed. –  Kyle Strand Apr 2 '13 at 8:54
    
oooo sorry, You answered it. Thanks a lot –  ahadcse Apr 2 '13 at 9:12
    from itertools import product
    from itertools import izip_longest  # This is used to deal with variable length of lists

    dictList = {1:[1,3,4,8], 2:[5,7,2,8], 3:[6,3,5,7,8]}

    dict1 = [dict(izip_longest(dictList, v)) for v in product(*dictList.values())]

    for dict2 in dict1:
        for key, value in dict2.items():
            print key, value
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