Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following problem, i have a SQL file to execute with DBI CPAN module Perl I saw two solution on this website to solve my problem.

  1. Read SQL file line by line

  2. Read SQL file in one instruction

So, which one is better, and what the real difference between each solution ?

EDIT

It's for a library. I need to retrieve output and the return code.

Kind of files passed might be as following:

    set serveroutput on;
    set pagesize 20000;
    spool "&1."
    DECLARE
        -- Récupération des arguments
        -- &2: FLX_REF, &3: SVR_ID, &4: ACQ_STT, &5: ACQ_LOG, &6: FLX_COD_DOC, &7: ACQ_NEL, &8: ACQ_TYP    
        VAR_FLX_REF VARCHAR2(100):=&2;
        VAR_SVR_ID NUMBER(10):=&3;
        VAR_ACQ_STT NUMBER(4):=&4;
        VAR_ACQ_LOG VARCHAR2(255):=&5;
        VAR_FLX_COD_DOC VARCHAR2(30):=&6;
        VAR_ACQ_NEL NUMBER(10):=&7;
        VAR_ACQ_TYP NUMBER:=&8;
    BEGIN
        INSERT INTO ACQUISITION_CFT 
            (ACQ_ID, FLX_REF, SVR_ID, ACQ_DATE, ACQ_STT, ACQ_LOG, FLX_COD_DOC, ACQ_NEL, ACQ_TYP) 
        VALUES 
            (TRACKING.SEQ_ACQUISITION_CFT.NEXTVAL, ''VAR_FLX_REF'', 
                ''VAR_SVR_ID'', sysdate, VAR_ACQ_STT, ''VAR_ACQ_LOG'',
                ''VAR_FLX_COD_DOC'', VAR_ACQ_NEL, VAR_ACQ_TYP);
    END;

    /
    exit;

I have another question to ask, again with DBI Oracle module. May i use the same code for SQL file and for Control file ?

(Example of SQL Control file)

    LOAD DATA
    APPEND INTO TABLE DOSSIER
    FIELDS TERMINATED BY ';'
    (
    DSR_IDT,
    DSR_CNL,
    DSR_PRQ,
    DSR_CEN,
    DSR_FEN,
    DSR_AN1,
    DSR_AN2,
    DSR_AN3,
    DSR_AN4,
    DSR_AN5,
    DSR_AN6,
    DSR_PI1,
    DSR_PI2,
    DSR_PI3,
    DSR_PI4,
    DSR_NP1,
    DSR_NP2,
    DSR_NP3,
    DSR_NP4,
    DSR_NFL,
    DSR_NPG,
    DSR_LTP,
    DSR_FLF,
    DSR_CLR,
    DSR_MIM,
    DSR_TIM,
    DSR_NDC,
    DSR_EMS NULLIF DSR_EMS=BLANKS "sysdate",
    JOB_IDT,
    DSR_STT,
    DSR_DAQ "CASE WHEN :DSR_DAQ IS NOT NULL THEN SYSDATE ELSE NULL END"

    )
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Reading a table one row at a time is more complex, but it can use less memory - provided you structure your code to make use of the data per item and not need it all later.

Often you want to process each item separately (e.g. to do work on the data), in which case you might as well use the read line-by-line approach to define your loop.

I tend to use single-instruction approach by default, but as soon as I am concerned about number of records (especially in long-running batch processes), or need to loop through the data as the first task, then I read records one-by-one.

share|improve this answer
    
But with huge file, more than 150Mb, it still better to use one instruction than line by line ? –  Xavier S. Apr 2 '13 at 8:36
1  
I think you have misunderstood the question. He's talking about reading a text file that contains SQL statements and running those against the database. –  Dave Cross Apr 2 '13 at 10:00

In fact, the two answers you reference propose the same solution, to read and execute line-by-line (but the first is clearer on the point). The second question has an optional answer, where the file contains a single statement.

If you don't execute the SQL line-by-line, it's very difficult to trap any errors.

share|improve this answer
    
In the first case file is passed line by line, in the second case file description is passed through "prepare" function. SQL file structure is like "DECLARE" ... "BEGIN" ... "END" –  Xavier S. Apr 2 '13 at 8:50
1  
It's true, in the second case, the SQL statement can span multiple lines in the text file, which is not the case with the first. This is important to understand. –  grahamj42 Apr 2 '13 at 9:20

"Line by line" only makes sense if each SQL statement is on a single line. You probably mean statement by statement.

Beyond that, it depends on what your SQL file looks like and what you want to do.

How complex is your SQL file? Could it contain things like this?

select foo from table where column1 = 'bar;';   --Get foo; it will be used later.

The simple way to read an SQL file statement by statement is to split by semicolons (or whatever the statement delimiter is). But this method will fail if you might have semicolons in other places, like comments or strings. If you split this statement by semicolons, you would try to execute the following four "commands":

select foo from table where column1 = 'bar;
';
--Get foo; 
it will be used later.

Obviously, none of these are valid. Handling statements like this correctly is no simple matter. You have to completely parse SQL to figure out what the statements are. Unfortunately, there is no ready-made module that can do this for you (SQL::Script is a good start on an SQL file processing module, but according to the documentation it just splits on semicolons at this point).

If your SQL file is simple, not containing any statement delimiters within statements or comments; or if it is predictable in some other way (such as having one statement per line), then it is easy to split the file into statements and execute them one by one. But if you have to handle arbitrary SQL syntax, including cases such as above, this will be a complex task.

What kind of task?

  • Do you need to retrieve the output?
  • Is it important to detect errors in any individual statement, or is it just a batch job that you can run and not worry about it?

If this is something that you can just run and forget about, you could just have Perl execute a system command, telling Oracle to process the file. This will be simpler than handling all of the statements yourself. But if you need to process the results or handle errors within Perl, doing it yourself statement by statement will be a necessity.

Update: based on your response, you want to write a library that can handle arbitrary SQL statements. In that case, you definitely need to parse the SQL and execute the statements one at a time. This is do-able, but not simple. The possibility of BEGIN...END blocks means that you have to be able to correctly handle semicolons within a statement.

The SQL::Statement class of modules may be helpful.

share|improve this answer
    
SQL file could be simple or complex. It is for a library. So any part of the software using it, may use simple file as "SELECT * FROM MY_TABLE;" or use "DECLARE ... BEGIN ... END" or use a SQL Control file. I need to retrieve the error code and output. –  Xavier S. Apr 2 '13 at 9:38
    
@binogure, thanks for the clarification. See the updated answer. –  dan1111 Apr 2 '13 at 9:44
    
I want use DBI CPAN module. And i want to do a simple library. Which separate kind of requests: "INSERT/SELECT/SQLFILE/PROCFILE". My original question is "which one is better, read line by line or read file one shot ?" –  Xavier S. Apr 2 '13 at 9:52
    
@binogure, as I said in my answer, "if you need to process the results or handle errors within Perl...line by line will be a necessity". Given the requirements you have stated, it has to be line-by-line. Unfortunately, there is no simple way to do this (at least not that I am aware of). Note: really it is not line by line but statement by statement that you want. –  dan1111 Apr 2 '13 at 10:05
    
@binogure, if possible, I suggest adding additional requirements to simplify your task. If you can say, "each statement delimiter in the file must be on a line by itself", for example, then your task will be a lot simpler. But if you have to process an external file for which you have no control over formatting, this is a hard job. –  dan1111 Apr 2 '13 at 10:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.