Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I am developing a web app which requires events. The user creates an event at a specific time, and I need a script to be executed and activate the event at the exact time, so the event can start. Any ideas on how I can do this? I googled and searched through stack overflow, but all I encountered was multiple execution at specific time. What I need is execution at automatically set time. Hope you help me, I'm desperate.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Dagon, Jocelyn, Yasir Arsanukaev, David Cesarino, Vishal Apr 3 '13 at 3:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
In all your googling, you never encountered cron? –  Mark Baker Apr 2 '13 at 8:53
1  
Cron Jobs. Goooooogle them :) –  Hanky 웃 Panky Apr 2 '13 at 8:53
    
I did, but as I commented below I am not sure if I can install cron jobs –  Mark Apr 2 '13 at 9:09
    
how about finding out first, before looking for alternatives –  Dagon Apr 2 '13 at 9:14
    
ok, I'll try it :) can you please post a download link for cron jobs? –  Mark Apr 2 '13 at 9:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have 3 options. My recommendation: Use cron if you can, user driven if you have to, and daemon as a last resort.

(1) cron (as mentioned in comments)

cron is a scheduler for linux systems that will run a command line job on your system. You log into your server over ssh, type crontab -e, and add a line like this:

4 5 * * * php /path/to/my/script.php

This would run the script at 5:04 a.m. every day.

<?php
// /path/to/my/script.php

// Do something

Some hosting services allow entering cron jobs with a GUI. There are also external cron services, that will call a URL for you at specific times.

(2) daemon

This is the most advanced option and also the least reliable: You run a command line script that contains an infinite loop. The script then periodically checks state and responds to it. Because it is likely to crash after months of running, you have to have a second script to restart it in case it does. This is a lot of work, but it is the most flexible approach.

<?php



while (1) {   

  // fetch $last_exec_timestamp from database

  if ($last_exec_timestamp < time() + 86400) {
    // set last_exec_timestamp to now in database

    // do something
  }
  sleep(5);

}

3. user driven

If you have a decent amount of traffic on your site, you can simply include a the job this in your page footer, when there is no more output. Make sure this code is fast, or an unlucky user will be waiting for it.

<?php

// fetch $last_exec_timestamp from database

if ($last_exec_timestamp < time() + 86400) {
  // set last_exec_timestamp to now in database
  // do something
}

There are also to more fancy approaches of "user driven" that I haven't personally tested in another stack overflow question.

share|improve this answer
    
You might add that there are Windows and Mac alternatives to cron –  Mark Baker Apr 2 '13 at 10:01
1  
One further option is MySQL EVENTS - dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/create-event.html –  Mark Baker Apr 2 '13 at 10:02
    
thank you very much! I think I will use the user driven method, it's not something very important that must be server-side solved after all :) –  Mark Apr 2 '13 at 22:53

What u are looking for is CRON JOBS

http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/php/managing-cron-jobs-with-php-2/

share|improve this answer
    
I am not sure if I can install cron jobs on the server, is there an alternative? –  Mark Apr 2 '13 at 9:08

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.