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I have two bat which are running and I have to wait that "job.bat" is ended off before run "another.bat" because "another.bat" is using a file which comes from "job.bat". Please How to synchronize them within the vbs? Thanks

shell.run "job.bat ""my file""" & " " & myVar
'shell.exit
shell.run "another.bat ""lib.txt""" & " " & outVar

I used this one between these two shell.run, waiting for file out is available from the first bat but it doesn't change anything

  While Not oFSO.FileExists("out") 
   wait 10
   Wend

I'm surprised because i had always thought the vbs program is sequential access (sequential instructions), while I was seeing "another.bat" was beeing launched before "job.bat" is terminated!!!!!

share|improve this question

You may use the optional boolean parameter bWaitOnReturn so that Shell.Run will wait for the command to complete before continuing execution of the wsh script.

So, the general syntax of

Shell.Run (strCommand, [intWindowStyle], [bWaitOnReturn]) 

could in your case look like this:

shell.run "job.bat ""my file""" & " " & myVar, , True
'shell.exit
shell.run "another.bat ""lib.txt""" & " " & outVar
share|improve this answer

The execution of your VBS is sequential. It's just that by default the Shell.Run function doesn't wait for the invoked command/program to finish before going on. It is very likely merely a wrapper around a corresponding system function, possibly ShellExecute or ShellExecuteEx (which you may not need to know), and it's the underlying system function's default behaviour that affects that of VBS's Shell.Run.

The best solution in this case would probably be to explicitly specify that the Run function should wait for the termination of the first batch file, as per @PA's answer. Note, though, that you could achieve the same effect if you called the two batch files with a single Shell.Run call, delimiting the two commands with an ampersand (&). That is basically like this:

Shell.Run "command1 & command2"

or, applying to your particular situation, like this:

Shell.Run "job.bat ""my file""" & " " & myVar & " & another.bat ""lib.txt""" & " " & outVar
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much Andriy. it's OK! – tamo Apr 8 '13 at 11:19

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