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I am new to SVG and Raphael.js, so while the code I have written works as I expected/wanted, I want to check if what I have done is best practice/the right way, or if there is a better way.

I have a path, it's basically an off-circle (as per the brand). I got the path by converting a PNG to SVG (online). The problem I had was while the image was meant to be 72x72px, the on-line converter had scaled it to something pretty big.

This has actually worked in my favour as I need to use the circle in various sizes.

So I used .transform() to scale it down and transform it to the size I need it to be. It feels like a bit of a hack. Is there a better way? Or is this the best you can do?

Here is my code: http://jsfiddle.net/9LHUE/.

Thanks in advance.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using .transform() is just fine. The whole idea of "Scalable Vector Graphics" is that they are, well, scalable. Since they are rendered on the page from coordinate-based definitions, they should look just as good at any size.

What feels like a hack to me is importing this nicely geometric figure from a png, rather than working out the definitions in a more mathematical way. I doubt you really need so monstrous a bezier curve for so simple a shape.

That said, I don't know what an "off-circle" is. Maybe it's not simple at all.

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The problem I have is the "off circle" is the client's brand. It's not a circle. More like a head! – jamesmhaley Apr 2 '13 at 16:42
    
I find that Inkscape is really useful in that situation. Just import the PNG and use the pen tool to draw a curve over it. Once it looks right, use the path data in the XML editor. I'm not sure, but I'd imagine that a curve you draw this way would be less complex than one generated from a PNG, not to mention you have the ability to tweak it as much as you want. Just my two cents. – David John Welsh May 20 '13 at 11:30

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