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I have the following scenarios and I intend to know when a context switching can happen.

Scenario 1: A java thread has called a wait on an object but the time slice of that thread is still left.

Scenario 2:-A java thread is waiting on the results of a database query but the time slice of that thread is still left.

Scenario 3:-A java thread is waiting on the results of a database query but the time slice of that thread is still finished.

Scenario 4:-A java thread is doing some computation but the time slice of that thread is still finished.

Any other scenario where in a context switching can take place but I am missing out on it ?

I am thinking on using these scenarios to find out if the thread pool size can be greater than Runtime.getRuntime.availableProcessors() Thanks

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I am thinking on using these scenarios to find out if the thread pool size can be greater than Runtime.getRuntime.availableProcessors() => You should probably explain in more details what your ultimate goal is - as your approach is possibly not the appropriate one. –  assylias Apr 2 '13 at 10:38
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A context switch can take place anywhere at any time. –  nos Apr 2 '13 at 11:52
    
@assylias- The idea is that I have to use the number of threads w.r.t the number of available processors in such a way that if former is greater than the latter not by a great number, context switching does not become a headache rather it is advantageous. So if context switching happens against Scenario 2, it is actually advantageous. –  100pipers Apr 2 '13 at 12:13
    
Another thread, of higher priority in the same, or another, process becomes ready, (maybe it's IO request is completed), there are no cores free to run it and the OS scheduler decides to stop your java thread 'immediately', preempting it to run the higher-priority thread instead. –  Martin James Apr 2 '13 at 19:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If a thread is doing something, e.g. calls wait(), this implies that time slice is not exhausted. If a thread is blocked because of calling wait(), or waits for I/O result (including database result), then time slice is not counted. It starts counting as soon as the thread is unblocked and resumes execution. If time slice is exhausted, this means that the thread have been constantly running and was not blocked in any way.

As a result, your scenarios classification is incorrect.

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My understanding is that a thread can be put of the CPU if it's time slice is over or if it waits for an I/O result. Is the understanding correct ? –  100pipers Apr 2 '13 at 14:53
    
Generally, yes. Not can but must. And also must be put off when blocked on wait or synchronized. If slice is over, and there is no unblocked thread ready for execution, it resumes execution immediately, starting new time slice. –  Alexei Kaigorodov Apr 2 '13 at 17:37

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