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I have a very large table where I have temperatures getting logged every 1 mins, what I would like to query is a trend; something like a percentage increase or percentage decrease per selected period ( hour or 15mins; depending on the query)

my table looks (example) like the following

ID      time                temp
119950  2013-03-27 07:56:05 27.25
119951  2013-03-27 07:57:05 27.50
119952  2013-03-27 07:58:05 27.60
119953  2013-03-27 07:59:05 27.80
119954  2013-03-27 08:00:05 27.70
119955  2013-03-27 08:01:05 27.50
119956  2013-03-27 08:02:05 27.25
119957  2013-03-27 08:03:05 27.10
119958  2013-03-27 08:04:05 26.9
119959  2013-03-27 08:05:05 27.1
119960  2013-03-27 08:06:05 27.25
119961  2013-03-27 08:07:05 27.6

I believe a trend can be calculated as follow (as per link), but correct me if you have a better way; take the difference between each row then add then up and divide by count. so for the table above we get

Diff
+0.25
+0.10
+0.20
-0.10
-0.20
-0.25
-0.15
-0.20
+0.20
+0.15
+0.35

The trend per minute for last 11 minutes is sum of diff/11. which gives 0.063C per minute for last 11minutes.

Can someone please help me get percentage trend per hour for last 3 hours. and trend per minute for 1 hour?

share|improve this question
1  
Observe that the sum of all those differences is equal to the difference between the initial and final values. Percentage change can therefore be obtained from final/initial - 1 - e.g. 27.6/27.25 - 1 ~= +1.28%. –  eggyal Apr 2 '13 at 11:29
    
Thanks, but the above table is just an example. this is an exception. generally the values will be all over the place and the sum of all differences will not equal the dif between initial and final. –  Ossama Apr 2 '13 at 11:37
1  
No - the sum of all differences will always equal the difference between initial and final, due to the associativity of addition. –  eggyal Apr 2 '13 at 11:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
CREATE TABLE temperature_log
(ID      INT NOT NULL,dt DATETIME NOT NULL, temperature DECIMAL(5,2) NOT NULL);

INSERT INTO temperature_log VALUES
(119950  ,'2013-03-27 07:56:05',27.25),
(119951  ,'2013-03-27 07:57:05', 27.50),
(119952  ,'2013-03-27 07:58:05', 27.60),
(119953  ,'2013-03-27 07:59:05', 27.80),
(119954  ,'2013-03-27 08:00:05', 27.70),
(119955  ,'2013-03-27 08:01:05', 27.50),
(119956  ,'2013-03-27 08:02:05', 27.25),
(119957  ,'2013-03-27 08:03:05', 27.10),
(119958  ,'2013-03-27 08:04:05', 26.9),
(119959  ,'2013-03-27 08:05:05', 27.1),
(119960  ,'2013-03-27 08:06:05', 27.25),
(119961  ,'2013-03-27 08:07:05', 27.6);

SELECT x.*
     , x.temperature - y.temperature diff
     , COUNT(*) cnt
     ,(x.temperature-y.temperature)/COUNT(*) trend 
  FROM temperature_log x 
  JOIN temperature_log y 
    ON y.id < x.id 
 GROUP 
    BY x.id;
+--------+---------------------+-------------+-------+-----+-----------+
| ID     | dt                  | temperature | diff  | cnt | trend     |
+--------+---------------------+-------------+-------+-----+-----------+
| 119951 | 2013-03-27 07:57:05 |       27.50 |  0.25 |   1 |  0.250000 |
| 119952 | 2013-03-27 07:58:05 |       27.60 |  0.35 |   2 |  0.175000 |
| 119953 | 2013-03-27 07:59:05 |       27.80 |  0.55 |   3 |  0.183333 |
| 119954 | 2013-03-27 08:00:05 |       27.70 |  0.45 |   4 |  0.112500 |
| 119955 | 2013-03-27 08:01:05 |       27.50 |  0.25 |   5 |  0.050000 |
| 119956 | 2013-03-27 08:02:05 |       27.25 |  0.00 |   6 |  0.000000 |
| 119957 | 2013-03-27 08:03:05 |       27.10 | -0.15 |   7 | -0.021429 |
| 119958 | 2013-03-27 08:04:05 |       26.90 | -0.35 |   8 | -0.043750 |
| 119959 | 2013-03-27 08:05:05 |       27.10 | -0.15 |   9 | -0.016667 |
| 119960 | 2013-03-27 08:06:05 |       27.25 |  0.00 |  10 |  0.000000 |
| 119961 | 2013-03-27 08:07:05 |       27.60 |  0.35 |  11 |  0.031818 |
+--------+---------------------+-------------+-------+-----+-----------+

Incidentally, if you're interested in getting average results per hour, you could do something like this...

SELECT DATE_FORMAT(x.dt,'%Y-%m-%d %h:00:00')
     , AVG(x.temperature) avg_temp
  FROM temperature_log x 
 GROUP 
    BY DATE_FORMAT(x.dt,'%Y-%m-%d %h:00:00');
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but since I 100 of thansands of values, would you be able to insert a filter to get hourly temperatures for a period of 3 hours? –  Ossama Apr 3 '13 at 8:33
    
Yes, but that's a different question. It would be inappropriate to amend the answer without first amending the question (or accepting it and then asking a new one). –  Strawberry Apr 3 '13 at 8:39
    
I really appreciate your help, Thank you :). my original question does mention this, as I have so much data; i cannot see if your answer works, it will take soooo looong to get result for everything, if! –  Ossama Apr 3 '13 at 8:44
    
OK, in that case can you explain how the percentage trend per hour is calculated? Googling "percentage trend per hour" only returns this page, which suggests it's something you've just invented! –  Strawberry Apr 3 '13 at 9:29
    
What you have calculated is perfect I believe, I need to limit the data pulled from my database. i.e if i apply your query above, my query will timeout because it will need to pull all the 120000 values. but if you could add a: SELECT DATE(time) + INTERVAL (HOUR(time) DIV 1 * 1) HOUR and WHERE DATE(time) >= NOW() - INTERVAL 3 HOURS, something like this. –  Ossama Apr 3 '13 at 10:15

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