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i am new here and i am sorry of this "problem" is a bit too stupid for some of you. I have to do a C++ Project on k-mean clustering at university and i need some help. Here is the code. It is working. Now, i have to build the G-Matrix seperately. Within the code i get the following:

 4.30  0.50   * 1 *
 3.54  0.50   * 1 *
 0.71  3.20   * 0 *
 0.71  4.61   * 0 *

The coordinates of the centroid are:

 4.50
 3.50

The coordinates of the centroid are:

1.50
1.00

This is fine, but i need the 1,1,0,0 in an additional G-Matrix like this:

A B C D
1 1 0 0 ->c1
0 0 1 1 ->c2  

where A,B,C,D are the points and c1 and c2 are the centroids. Any idea how to display this?

Here my code:

float dmin, dpoint;
float sum[2][2];
int cluster[4], count[4], group;
float flips;
const int rows = 4;
const int columns = 2;
const int crows = 2;
const int ccolumns = 2;

// initialize the points


int point[rows][columns]={{1,1},{2,1},{4,3},{5,4}};


// initialize the centroids

double centroid [crows][ccolumns] = {{1,1},{2,1}};


// ...

for (i = 0; i<4; i++) cluster[i] = 0;

// until there is no change of clusters belonging to each pattern, continue

flips = 4;
while (flips>0) {

    flips = 0;

    for (j = 0; j < 2; j++) 
    {
        count[j] = 0; 
        for (i = 0; i < 2; i++) 
            sum[j][i] = 0;
    }


    // now, we need to calculate the distance

    for (i = 0; i < 4; i++) {

        dmin = 2; group = cluster[i];
        for (j = 0; j < 2; j++)
        {

            dpoint = 0.0;

            dpoint +=  sqrt(pow((point[i][0] - centroid[j][0]),2)+pow((point[i][1] - centroid[j][1]),2));
            fprintf(stdout, "%5.2f ", dpoint); // Show the value of the distance
            if (dpoint < dmin) {
                group = j;
                dmin = dpoint;
            }
        }

        // now, we need to calculate the G matrix (1 or 0)

        fprintf(stdout, "  * %d *\n", group); // displays 0 or 1 (to which cluster it belongs)

        if (cluster[i] != group) 
        {
            flips++;
            cluster[i] = group; // repeat this process until G(n)=G(n+1)
        }

        count[cluster[i]]++;

        for (j = 0; j < 2; j++) 
            sum[cluster[i]][j] += point[i][j];
    }

    // now, display the coordinates of the centroid

    for (i = 0; i < 2; i++) {
        fprintf(stderr," The coordinates of the centroid are: \n");
        for (j = 0; j < 2; j++) {
            centroid[i][j] = sum[i][j]/count[i];
            fprintf(stderr, "%5.2f \n", centroid[i][j]);
        }
    }


}

}

Thanks for your help!

share|improve this question
    
What is K in this context? I mean how many clusters you would like to partition into? – taocp Apr 2 '13 at 13:35
1  
Homework exercise? – Roalt Apr 2 '13 at 13:37
    
What's a G-matrix? – Fred Foo Apr 2 '13 at 15:19
    
In this exercise i have 4 points which i have to allocate to two centroids. I have another exercise with 100 points and 10 centroids, so the method should be able to extend... The G-Matrix displays the corresponding group for every point. So, A B C D 1 1 0 0 ->c1 0 0 1 1 ->c2 means that Point A and B belong to Group one and C and D to Group two. – user2236246 Apr 2 '13 at 19:03

Well, translate that third column of yours into a G-Matrix.

It's actually trivial. That column gives you the row number to set to 1.

share|improve this answer

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