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Is there a way to reduce the number of figures of a number?

Example:

double d = 222222222222222224444444444444.0

I want to "serialize" it like 17[2]13[4] for example.

The idea is to reduce the number of "chars" used by the number.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Wooble, EJP, rene, Szymon, gunr2171 Apr 2 at 16:18

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Yes, there is a way. Were you thinking of doing this in a shell, in some particular language, or on a Turing machine? –  Beta Apr 2 '13 at 13:57
    
What would you like the output to be for d = 123456 ? –  Dennis Jaheruddin Apr 2 '13 at 13:57
    
@Beta I think to do this in C# –  Florian Apr 3 '13 at 9:47
    
@DennisJaheruddin for d = 123456 I don't see how to reduce the numbers of figures so the output will be 123456 I think –  Florian Apr 3 '13 at 9:48
    
I don't know C#. Do you know how to 1) convert the number to a string, and 2) iterate over the string? –  Beta Apr 3 '13 at 15:01
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1 Answer

double d = 222222222222222224444444444444.0

You can't have a double that big in the first place.

I want to "serialize" it like 17[2]13[4] for example. The idea is to reduce the number of "chars" used by the number.

A double only takes 8 bytes regardless of its value. There doesn't seem to be any actual point to this.

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Well, you could store 17[2]13[4] in a string. But agreed about there being no point. –  Cody Gray Apr 5 '13 at 5:54
    
As 'the idea is to reduce the number of "chars" used by the number' there certainly isn't. –  EJP Apr 5 '13 at 7:01
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