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Why is this the default behavior of numpy?

In [5]: np.dtype(None)
Out[5]: dtype('float64')

I was hoping to use np.issubdtype(None,float) for some type-checking involving return types for images (PIL likes 0-255 images, skimage likes [0,1) images), but that does not work. I'd be interested in a clean-looking workaround, but I'll be satisfied with an answer to the main question.

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Could you explain a little more why you would want to use None in the first place as one of the arguments to np.issubdtype? –  JoshAdel Apr 2 '13 at 14:18
    
something like this: def f(x,dtype=None): if np.issubdtype(dtype,float): return convert_to_float(x) else: return x –  keflavich Apr 2 '13 at 17:34
    
Is dtype here just x.dtype? If it is, just use it and you won't have to worry about a default. Also, do you mean if not np.issubdtype(. . )? –  JoshAdel Apr 2 '13 at 19:04
    
No, dtype should be a keyword in this context. And, not doesn't matter, I was actually going to have a few cases for different dtypes. Normally, you'd want to duck-type, but with RGB images, you actually need different numerical scaling depending on the data type. –  keflavich Apr 2 '13 at 21:50
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a special case where None is converted to the default dtype. See:

https://github.com/numpy/numpy/issues/2190

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