Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a global kernel function with template argument:

template<int ARG> __global__ void kernel(array[]) {
    int threadID = blockDim.x*blockIdx.x + threadIdx.x;
    if(...) {...}
}

The behaviour of the function, and a specially if-statement condition, is slightly varying in consideration of template argument but the body stays the same. Lets say:
ARG == 0 if statement looks like: if(expr1){body}
ARG == 1 if statement looks like: if(expr2){body}
ARG == 2 if statement looks like: if(expr1 && expr2){body}

My question is what is the best way(in a sense of readability and performance) to provide this?

EDIT: Expressions expr1 and expr2 are calls to __device__ boolean functions, e.g. fnc1(array[threadID]) and fnc2(array[threadID]).

share|improve this question
1  
it depends on what the expressions depend on etc. can't be reasonably answered in the abstract. give concrete example –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Apr 2 '13 at 14:26
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf I did the edit. –  stuhlo Apr 2 '13 at 14:34
    
@DrewDormann. The body of my if-statements is very long as well as if-statements occur few times. Hence, I would get very long code. –  stuhlo Apr 2 '13 at 14:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The straightforward approach is brute force:

if ((ARG != 1 || expr1) && (ARG != 0 || expr2)) ...

Since ARG is known at compile time, the compiler will generate good code here.

share|improve this answer
    
This assumes that expr1 is a well-formed expression regardless of ARG. This can be non-trivial: is ARG != 0 || (Foo/ARG) == Bar well-formed? –  MSalters Apr 2 '13 at 14:53

You can declare an auxiliary class template:

template<int ARG>
class IfCondition {
};

and specialize it for different values of ARG:

template<>
class IfCondition<0> {
public:
    static bool Get() {
        return expr1;
    }
};

template<>
class IfCondition<1> {
public:
    static bool Get() {
        return expr2;
    }
};

template<>
class IfCondition<2> {
public:
    static bool Get() {
        return expr1 && expr2;
    }
};

Then use it inside your template like this:

if (IfCondition<ARG>::Get())
     ...

}

The nice thing about it is that, with inlining, it'll be as fast as literally writing if(expr1) {body} or if (expr2) {body} or whatnot.

EDIT

Another way to go is with template function specialization:

template<int ARG>
bool ifCondition() { return false; }

template<>
bool ifCondition<0>() { return expr1; }

template<>
bool ifCondition<1>() { return expr2; }

template<>
bool ifCondition<2>() { return expr1 && expr2; }

// Then later, inside your template:
if (ifCondition<ARG>()) {
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

ARG == 0 if statement looks like: if(expr1){body}

ARG == 1 if statement looks like: if(expr2){body}

ARG == 2 if statement looks like: if(expr1 && expr2){body}

Code that directly, since that's your own interpretation of readable.

It will be performant since ARG can be resolved at compile time.

if ( ARG == 0 && expr1 ) {body}

if ( ARG == 1 && expr2) {body}

if ( ARG == 2 && expr1 && expr2 ) {body}

Or, if {body} is heavy, combine them.

if ( ARG == 0 && expr1 ) ||

   ( ARG == 1 && expr2) ||

   ( ARG == 2 && expr1 && expr2 ) {body}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.