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Someone told me sometimes event delegate more efficient.

<ul id="test">
    <li>aaaaa<li>
    <li>bbbbb <p>xxxxx<p> </li>
    <li>ccccc<li>
</ul>

//script
var li = document.getElementByTagName('li');
for(var i=0,len=li.length;i<len;i++){
    li[i].addEventListener('click',function(){ alert(this.innerHTML); },false);
}

//event delegate
var ul = document.getElementById('test');
ul.addEventListener('click',function(e){
    if(e.target == 'li'){
        alert(e.target.innerHTML);
    }
},false);

It works not good when you click 'p' in 'li'. I know jquery has method 'on',it's useful. I try to read jquery source code ,but can not understand how to implement a delegate function work under complexity DOM.

share|improve this question
    
@Dom that was not the question. OP wants to write his own delegate function based upon jquerys on. –  Christoph Apr 2 '13 at 15:27
    
The reason it doesn't work for the p is the p isn't the li you are testing for. Just ensure that the target is a child of the element you are delegating the event to, or the element itself. –  Kevin B Apr 2 '13 at 15:29
    
You could try to write a more efficient event delegation function, or you could try to optimize the element selector. It depends on the situation, but in this situation, I would apply and id to <p>. –  Paul Sham Apr 2 '13 at 15:30
    
you need to loop through parents till you find a match of your delegation and stop the loop when you match the element you execute addEventListener –  Eru Apr 2 '13 at 15:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In this code:

//event delegate
var ul = document.getElementById('test');
ul.addEventListener('click',function(e){
    if(e.target == 'li'){
        alert(e.target.innerHTML);
    }
},false);

the (single) event handler will be called for any click anywhere in the <ul> element.

If you wish to find which <li> received the click, even if the click was actually in some child element, you need to climb the DOM tree until you find the desired element.

//event delegate
var ul = document.getElementById('test');
ul.addEventListener('click',function(e) {
    var el = e.target;
    while (el) {
        if (el.tagName === 'li') {
            alert(el.innerHTML);
            break;
        } else {
            el = el.parentNode;      // climb the tree
            if (el === this) break;  // but not too far!
        }
    }
}, false);

The second parameter to jQuery's .on does that DOM climbing for you - it emulates the DOM's event bubbling until it finds the element that matches the specified selector.

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't the while loop also break; if el is the same as ul? So that it doesn't continue climbing the DOM past what the event was bound to? –  Ian Apr 2 '13 at 15:55
    
@Ian hmm, good point. updated, thanks. –  Alnitak Apr 2 '13 at 16:03

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