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I'm using EJB 3 with Hibernate. I have a stateless session Bean. There is a method deleteItem in that bean.

When a client call the deleteItem method then delete occurred without any problem. But If I'm trying to call the deleteItem method using a for loop and set the limit of that loop 5-10 times then sometimes the delete failed. But not always.

The delete operation actually delete data from 2 tables. The child table and the parent table. Each Delete is committed by performing flush operation.

As I already mentioned that if i execute the delete one by one then no problem happen, it only happen when i try to run it concurrently. The exception I'm getting is below

Caused by: java.sql.BatchUpdateException: Cannot delete or update a parent row: a foreign key
constraint fails (`functionTest/MotherTable`, CONSTRAINT `FKBC6CB0E6D5545EFD` FOREIGN KEY
(`MotherTable_FieldId`) REFERENCES `ChildTable` (`childTableId`))

There is no way to happen concurrent delete operation here. And Item delete is not related with other Item delete operation. So if still concurrency happens it will not be a problem for deleting multiple item at the same time.

So, i came to a decision that - "May be the clients are accessing the Same Bean Instance in Multiple Thread" . In such situation two thread keep the same Entity Manager State in different state. One tries to flush the Persistence Context when the other is not yet completed remove of child item. At that point the BatchUpdateException Occured. - It is my observation. I'm not 100% sure about it.

So to overcome this situation I have gone for Optimistic locking. I have created version column in the mother table. Now I'm getting the OptimisticLockException . But I'm not able to catch the exception. Below is the code which I'm using to catch the OptimisticLockException.

private boolean deleteItem(Item itemId) {

           Item item= getItem(itemId);
       removeChildTableData(item);
       mEm.remove(item);

    try
            {
       mEm.flush();
    }
    catch (OptimisticLockException  e) 
            {
         try {
            Thread.sleep(1000);
             } 
                     catch (InterruptedException e1) {
            e1.printStackTrace();
         }
       deleteItem(itemId);

        }
    catch(Exception ex)
                 {

        if (ex.getCause() instanceof OptimisticLockException) 
                     {
                       try {
                            Thread.sleep(1000);
                           } catch (InterruptedException x) {
                           }
                     deleteItem(itemId);

                     }


      }

    return true;
   }

So my target is to catch the OptimisticLockException and reExecute the Delete Operation Again. I have checked the Exception Class Name and it is EntityNotFound. But I see that in the stacktrace I'm getting OptimisticLockException as well as StaleObjectStateException.

So, Can anybody please guide me how I should catch this OptimisticLockException ?

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I think a full stack trace will help a lot, because the important thing is, where is the exception coming from. –  wildhemp Apr 2 '13 at 15:55
1  
You should trust what the error message says. If it says that a foreign key constraint is broken, it means that a foreign key constraint is broken. Adding optimistic lovking won't change anything. And you should not try to catch optimistic locking exceptions and continue using the same session and entities. It won't work. Read docs.jboss.org/hibernate/core/3.6/reference/en-US/html_single/… –  JB Nizet Apr 2 '13 at 16:20
    
@JBNizet - I understood your point. But the problem is it does not happen always. It only happen when the concurrency occurred. And yes you are right, after handling the optimistic lock exception I should run it in a new transaction. –  ifti24 Apr 2 '13 at 16:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You shouldn't. Also +1 to what JB said. This exception is trying to tell you something. You are trying to delete the parent row of a foreign key relation while a child is still referencing it. What are parent and child? Well:

a foreign key constraint fails (`functionTest/MotherTable`, CONSTRAINT `FKBC6CB0E6D5545EFD` FOREIGN KEY (`MotherTable_FieldId`) REFERENCES `ChildTable` (`childTableId`))

So MotherTable.MotherTableFieldId is referencing ChildTable.childTableId. And you're trying to delete a child while its mother is still pointing to it. That won't work.

I'm curious why you would have the relation this way, though. It seems that your model looks like this:

@Entity
@Table(name="MotherTable")
class Mother {
  @Id
  Long id;
  @ManyToOne
  @JoinColumn(name="MotherTable_FieldId")
  Child child;
}

@Entity
@Table(name="ChildTable"
class Child {
  @Id
  @Column(name="childTableId")
  Long id; 
  @OneToMany(mappedBy="child")
  Set<Mother> mothers;
}

which is odd since now your child can have many mothers. Maybe you wanted this instead:

@Entity
class Mother {
  @Id
  Long id;
  @OneToMany(mappedBy="mother")
  Set<Child> children;
}

@Entity
class Child {
  @Id
  Long id; 
  @ManyToOne
  @JoinColumn(name="mother_id")
  Mother mother;
}

In this case, your DAO method would look like this:

@Transactional
public void deleteFamily(Mother mother) {
  for (Child c: mother.getChildren()) {
    em.remove(c);
  }
  em.remove(mother);
}

You could also use cascading:

@Entity
class Mother {
  @Id
  Long id;
  @OneToMany(mappedBy="mother", cascading=CascadeType.ALL)
  Set<Child> children;
}

which simplifies the DAO method to:

@Transactional
public void deleteFamily(Mother mother) {
  em.remove(mother);
}

And even:

@Entity
class Mother {
  @Id
  Long id;
  @OneToMany(mappedBy="mother", cascading=CascadeType.ALL, orphanRemoval=true)
  Set<Child> children;
}

and now you don't have to em.remove() children:

@Transactional
public void deleteChild(Child child) {
  Mother m = child.getMother();
  m.getChildren().remove(child);
}

Also, you shouldn't try to commit transactions with em.flush(), that's wrong on several counts:

  1. Transactions are committed with em.getTransaction().commit()
  2. Think about what you're trying to do: is the deleteFamily supposed to happen in one transaction? Yes? Then implement it that way. Don't try to do a partial commit after deleting the children.
  3. It's much more convenient to let someone else manage the transactions for you. Just mark the methods as @Transactional and let your JTA framework handle the details.
  4. And DAO methods shouldn't even try to do transactions anyway. Think about this: you might want to implement a service later on that uses several DAO methods. If each of them tries to commit themselves in separate transactions the service call in toto cannot be a transaction. That's bad. So if you want to reuse your DAO methods, pull the transactional stuff into a separate layer above them.
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