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I am trying to solve the following problem. We have an object of arbitrary structure and an array of strings representing field names. This array is a path that is used to retrieve specific fields using reflection. Then there is a value that should be stored in the final field. For example consider the following class hierarchy:

class A {
  public int i;
}

class B {
  public A a;
}

class C {
  public B b;
}

class D {
  public C c;
}

Let's say we get the input somehow:

object obj = GetObject();              // e.g. returns object of type D
List<string> path = GetPathToStore();  // e.g. returns {"c", "b", "a", "i"}
object value = GetValueToBeStored();   // e.g. returns 42

I wrote the following loop:

foreach (string fieldName in path) {
  FileInfo fieldInfo = obj.GetType().GetField(fieldName);
  obj = fieldInfo.GetValue(obj);
}

Then would be nice to have something like this:

obj = value;

But this will only change the reference and not the actual field in the object. In C++ I would write:

*obj = value;

but how to do this in C#?

I also need to support an edge case when the path is empty in which case the root object itself needs to be assigned a different value.

EDIT: My code actually uses more complex approach to retrieve members. Entries in the path are not necessarily field names, they could also be a property name, index in an array or List, key in a Dictionary etc. Therefore a class wrapping it would be complex. I am looking for a simpler solution.

share|improve this question
    
BTW: It's C# coding convention not to use public fields except for readonly values. Use properties instead. They are cheap to write: public PropTypeA PropA { get; set; } –  chris Apr 2 '13 at 16:28
    
I will not design the classes, but my code supports both fields and properties alike. It's just a simplified version of it to demonstrate the problem. Thanks for the tip nevertheless. –  Sergiy Byelozyorov Apr 2 '13 at 16:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe something like this:

object obj = new D { c = new C { b = new B { a = new A { i = 1 } } } };
List<string> path = new List<string> { "c", "b", "a", "i" };
object value = 42;

FieldInfo fieldInfo = null;
object prevObj = null;
object obj2 = obj;
for (int i = 0; i < path.Count; i++)
{
    string fieldName = path[i];
    fieldInfo = obj2.GetType().GetField(fieldName);
    if (i == path.Count - 1) prevObj = obj2;
    obj2 = fieldInfo.GetValue(obj2);
}
if (fieldInfo != null)
{
    fieldInfo.SetValue(prevObj, value);
}
Console.WriteLine(((D)obj).c.b.a.i == (int) value);
share|improve this answer

You can add the extra layer of indirection in a managed language, just as you can through pointer manipulation. In general, this is usually done through the use of a new class, since you can think of a class in general as a pointer to an object.

public class FieldWrapper
{
    private object obj;
    private FieldInfo field;
    public FieldWrapper(object obj, FieldInfo field)
    {
        this.obj = obj;
        this.field = field;
    }

    public object Value
    {
        get
        {
            return field.GetValue(obj);
        }
        set
        {
            field.SetValue(obj, value);
        }
    }
}

By holding onto the object instance and the FieldInfo object you can get and set the value of that object. This allows you to pass an instance of FieldWrapper around and just get/set the property and have it affect the underlying field of the object supplied in the constructor.

If you need something more generic you can rely on closures:

public class Wrapper
{
    private Func<object> getter;
    private Action<object> setter;
    public Wrapper(Func<object> getter, Action<object> setter)
    {
        this.getter = getter;
        this.setter = setter;
    }

    public object Value
    {
        get
        { return getter(); }
        set
        { setter(value); }
    }
}

Then to use it you could do something like this:

Wrapper pointer = new Wrapper(()=> fieldInfo.GetValue(obj)
    , value =>  fieldInfo.SetValue(obj, value));

It takes a bit more work to create the objects, but has the same effect.

Another approach that you could take is to create a FieldWrapper, a PropertyWrapper, a DictionaryWrapper, etc. and have them all implement anIWrapperinterface that exposes aValue` so that once you create the wrapper you don't care what the underlying implementation is. That's a bit more work up front to create the wrapper for each type of object, but ends up taking less time to create each instance of the wrapped type.

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Please have a look at the edit in the question. –  Sergiy Byelozyorov Apr 2 '13 at 16:33

I'm not sure if I understand your question correctly, but I think you want:

var fieldInfo = obj.GetType().GetField(fieldName);
fieldInfo.SetValue(obj, newValue);

EDIT: To support properties as well as fields, try:

foreach(var memberInfo in obj.GetType().GetMember(memberName))
{
    if(memberInfo is FieldInfo)
    {
        ((FieldInfo)memberInfo).SetValue(obj, newValue);
    }
    else if(memberInfo is PropertyInfo)
    {
        ((PropertyInfo)memberInfo).SetValue(obj, newValue);
    }
    // etc ...
}

Not sure about how exactly you want to deal with indices, though. You CAN pass indices for indexed properties to PropertyInfo.SetValue().

share|improve this answer
    
That would be acceptable if I had fields only, but I support properties, array indices etc. Please have a look at the edit in the question. –  Sergiy Byelozyorov Apr 2 '13 at 16:34
    
Then you need to use GetMember() instead of GetField(). Check it out. –  chris Apr 2 '13 at 16:37

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