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We have a WCF service that is processing incoming messages in the following manner:

public bool ProcessMessage(string message)
{
    var returnValue = GetReturnValue();

    Task.Run(() => {
        //do some things with the message
        UpdateDatabase();
        SendRepliesOverNetwork();
    });

    return returnValue;
}

In an effort to process as many messages as possible, we added the task here. We want to return the returnValue to the caller as quickly as possible and let the Task do its thing.

My question: is there is any advantage to using the awaitable async database calls and/or using async methods for the replies over the network?

I'm cautious, as I think this may create too much context switching. We're already seeing the app using 100+ threads under load.

share|improve this question
    
it really depends on the context of your application, do you want to immediately make the UI responsive after sending the db update, or are you trying to do it for performance consideration? –  Kyle C Apr 2 '13 at 16:31
    
I don't think you're awaiting anything here: you are queuing work on the ThreadPool and returning to caller immediately. –  G. Stoynev Apr 2 '13 at 17:13
    
@KyleC: for performance. Trying to process as many messages, as quickly as possible. –  jeremywho Apr 2 '13 at 18:34
    
@G.Stoynev: You are correct, just queuing up all the work that needs to be done to process the message. I'm wondering if using async/await on the db/network access will make the threads available to other message processing while waiting for IO to complete. –  jeremywho Apr 2 '13 at 18:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First, I suggest you take a step back and really ask if returning early is a good idea. What you're doing is usually dangerous; you're returning the "OK" to the client before doing the actual processing. This is only a good idea if your client knows that "returnValue" doesn't mean the action is complete and only considers it complete upon receiving the "SendReplies".

That said, yes, you should see some benefit from making everything asynchronous that you can. If all your tasks are nonblocking, you'll get better use out of your thread pool (less context switching).

public bool ProcessMessage(string message)
{
  var returnValue = GetReturnValue();

  Task.Run(async () => {
    //do some things with the message
    await UpdateDatabaseAsync();
    await SendRepliesOverNetworkAsync();
  });

  return returnValue;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The returnValue is basically an application level ack to tell the caller we received its message. So doing the processing beyond the life of the call is fine. I'll go ahead and try out async db/network calls. –  jeremywho Apr 2 '13 at 18:39

I can see a couple of potential problems with this approach.

Firstly, if you're hosting your WCF service in IIS, using background threads that live longer than the request is a big no-no. When a request is complete, IIS is at liberty to tear down the whole AppDomain which will abort all background work with extreme predjudice!

Secondly, WCF will throttle requests if existing work is mounting up. With this pattern, you are handling the requests quickly and the amount of work queued for the thread pool may increase without limit.


You could try using WCF asynchronous service methods. This would free up threads that are just waiting for IO - your database and network access - which can improve throughput.

There's an in-depth article about this approach here: Dan Rigsby: Async Operations in WCF

Also, there's a section in MSDN here: WCF: Synchronous and Asynchronous Operations

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The wcf service is self hosted, so I think it should be ok. I'll look into the wcf async methods. –  jeremywho Apr 2 '13 at 18:41
    
Since the service is self hosted, it now becomes your problem instead of IIS'. Think about your plan for applying critical server OS security updates; you need a way to tell that the wcf service is not busy. –  Stephen Cleary Apr 3 '13 at 12:20

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