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Unless there is something wrong with my test, when I run this jsfiddle on Chrome I'm getting around 11ms for an $("#id") selector and 56ms for a $(div#id) selector.

$(document).ready(function(){
    startTime = new Date().getTime();
    for (i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
    {
        s = $("#idC12");
    }           
    $("#idResults").html("c12 by id only time: "+elapsedMilliseconds(startTime));

    startTime = new Date().getTime();
    for (i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
    {
        s = $("div#idC12");
    }           
    $("#classResults").html("c12 by tagname#id: "+elapsedMilliseconds(startTime));
});

function elapsedMilliseconds(startTime)
{
    var n = new Date();
    var s = n.getTime();
    var diff = s - startTime;
    return diff;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/MhWUc/

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In addition to the very good answers below, I would say as you should have unique Id's on a page, there's no point being so specific as div#id... –  Bartdude Apr 2 '13 at 17:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

That's because $(#id) internally uses the native document.getElementById function, which uses a map linking from the id to the (unique) element having this id.

Here's the relevant code in jQuery source :

        // Easily-parseable/retrievable ID or TAG or CLASS selectors
        rquickExpr = /^(?:#([\w-]+)|(\w+)|\.([\w-]+))$/
        ...
        // Speed-up: Sizzle("#ID")
        if ( (m = match[1]) ) {
            if ( nodeType === 9 ) {
                elem = context.getElementById( m );
                // Check parentNode to catch when Blackberry 4.6 returns
                // nodes that are no longer in the document #6963
                if ( elem && elem.parentNode ) {
                    // Handle the case where IE, Opera, and Webkit return items
                    // by name instead of ID
                    if ( elem.id === m ) {
                        results.push( elem );
                        return results;
                    }
                } else {
                    return results;
                }
            } else {
                // Context is not a document
                if ( context.ownerDocument && (elem = context.ownerDocument.getElementById( m )) &&
                    contains( context, elem ) && elem.id === m ) {
                    results.push( elem );
                    return results;
                }
            }

You'll notice that :

  • it's used when the regex detects the #someId form
  • any provided context only adds a test, and doesn't make it faster

Note that this rule is still true outside of jQuery, when defining CSS rules or using document.querySelector : when you know the id, there is nothing faster than using document.getElementById (apart a cached element...).

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Ready, set, GO! You win :) –  jmar777 Apr 2 '13 at 17:20
    
To add to this, $(div#id) has to run an extra selector on div. I'd have to look at the sizzle engine to see if $(#id) is first looked up and checked to ensure div-ness, but I imagine ir runs a querySelectAll(div) first, then checks for the id. –  Johnny Fuchs Apr 2 '13 at 17:21
    
Sometimes I forget why I use jQuery, and then I see some of the comments in there and remember why. It's a dark, dark world out there... –  jmar777 Apr 2 '13 at 17:23
1  
also, while the id attribute should be unique within an HTML document, if its not then $("#id") will only return the first element that matches that id, as getElementById() would. However $("*#id") will return all that satisfy the criteria. –  32bitkid Apr 2 '13 at 17:28

Been awhile since I've been in the source, but I know that #some-id selectors used to be handled by document.getElementById(), whereas more complex ones (e.g., tagName#some-id) have to go through sizzle and ultimately through document.querySelectorAll.

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$('div#id') is slower because it doesn't map directly to the native getElementById() method.

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When you use div#id, first all the divs are selected.

When you use #id, it goes directly to the table of ids.

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1  
Isn't it still a right-to-left implementation under the hood? –  jmar777 Apr 2 '13 at 17:21
    
@jmar777 I don't think so. I think that's how CSS works, not jQuery's selection process. I swear I just read something about this. Maybe I'm wrong. I'll look for it –  Ian Apr 2 '13 at 17:22
    
Pretty sure it's right-to-left... –  jmar777 Apr 2 '13 at 17:24
    
@jmar777 Or, it could be a special case where jQuery looks for the # anywhere in the string, and then maps the call directly to getElementById instead of just passing it to querySelectorAll –  Ian Apr 2 '13 at 17:25
1  
@Ian I think that thread is more relavant for #foo .bar style selectors, then .foo#bar. And the regex in the provided source doesn't match tagName#id selectors. However, you may be right about the right-to-left only applying at a "group" level. Think I might have to dig in some more on that one... –  jmar777 Apr 2 '13 at 17:45

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