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I've this table (CheckinTable):

  • id
  • created
  • latitude
  • longitude
  • user_id

where user_id is a foreign key to UserTable.

For each users I have more checkins, I need to perform a query that return me the latest checkin based on created field.

I can fetch the latest checkin with ORDER BY modified DESC but if I have to set another criteria (for example WHERE p.latitude BETWEEN 44.00 AND 41.00 AND p.longitude BETWEEN 9.18 AND 9.44) , how I can combine these two queries into one to load the latest checkin that respect geolocalizations clauses?

EDIT:

To avoid misunderstandings, I need to execute the query only ON THE LATEST CHECKIN for user, ordered by created DESC. I think that I need to extract the single latest checkin for each users (in the table checkin) and then apply the geolocalization clauses. How I can do it?

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3 Answers 3

Assuming I understand your question, you're trying to return each user and their max(created) date. If that is the case, I usually join the table on itself (although there are other options depending on your RDBMS):

select distinct t.*
from yourtable t
  join (
      select max(created) maxcreated, user_id
      from yourtable
      group by user_id
    ) t2 on t.user_id = t2.user_id and t.created = t2.maxcreated

And if you have WHERE criteria, put it in the subquery:

select distinct t.*
from yourtable t
  join (
      select max(created) maxcreated, user_id
      from yourtable
      where latitude between 44.00 and 41.00
      group by user_id
    ) t2 on t.user_id = t2.user_id and t.created = t2.maxcreated

SQL Fiddle Demo

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@Andomar -- I wasn't 100% sure what the OP was asking for. Mentioned for each user, return the latest checkin based on created. But yes, if the OP just wants the latest record with where criteria, above answer is correct. I'll delete if the OP doesn't need it :) –  sgeddes Apr 2 '13 at 18:00
    
You're right, looks like you can read the question that way. +1 :) –  Andomar Apr 2 '13 at 18:03
    
This query works, but there is another problem in my case. I need to execute the query only ON THE LATEST CHECKIN for user, ordered by created DESC. I think that I need to extract the single latest checkin for each users (in the table checkin) and then apply the geolocalization clauses. How I can do it? –  CeccoCQ Apr 3 '13 at 7:39

WHERE clauses and ORDER BY clauses are completely separate and can be mixed and matched however you want. The ORDER BY must always come after the WHERE.

SELECT * 
FROM CheckinTable as p 
WHERE p.latitude BETWEEN 44.00 AND 41.00 AND p.longitude BETWEEN 9.18 AND 9.44 
ORDER BY modified DESC
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Just to pull the appropriate record for a single user, where the user_id is 12345:

SELECT TOP 1 CheckinTable.*
FROM         CheckinTable
WHERE        CheckinTable.user_id = 12345
AND          CheckinTable.latitude >= 44.00
AND          CheckinTable.latitude <= 41.00
AND          CheckinTable.longitude >= 9.18
AND          CheckinTable.longitude <= 9.44
ORDER BY     CheckinTable.modified DESC

If you're trying to pull it for multiple users, you'd need to either use a subquery or the over and partition by statements (partition by is more efficient than grouping, but a bit quirky to use):

SELECT p.id ,
       p.created ,
       p.latitude ,
       p.longitude ,
       p.user_id
FROM   (
    SELECT CheckinTable.id ,
    CheckinTable.created ,
    CheckinTable.latitude ,
    CheckinTable.longitude ,
    CheckinTable.user_id ,
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY
        CheckinTable.user_id) AS the_row_number
    FROM         CheckinTable
    WHERE        CheckinTable.latitude >= 44.00
    AND          CheckinTable.latitude <= 41.00
    AND          CheckinTable.longitude >= 9.18
    AND          CheckinTable.longitude <= 9.44
    ORDER BY     CheckinTable.modified DESC ) p
WHERE    the_row_number = 1

Note that I prefer to use >= or <= and similar statements, rather than between, simply because sometimes you want a bit more control over what's returned than between (inclusive, exclusive, etc.). Also note that you'll obviously not get any results if the criteria in the where clause don't return anything for that particular user.

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