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I am currently trying to set up an Neural Network for information extraction and I am pretty fluent with the (basic) concepts of Neural Networks, except for one which seem to puzzle me. It is probably pretty obvious but I can't seem to found information about it.

Where/How do Neural Networks store their memory? ( / Machine Learning)

There is quite a bit of information available online about Neural Networks and Machine Learning but they all seem to skip over memory storage. For example after restarting the program, where does it find its memory to continue learning/predicting? Many examples online don't seem to 'retain' memory but I can't imagine this being 'safe' for real/big-scale deployment.

I have a difficult time wording my question, so please let me know if I need to elaborate a bit more. Thanks,


EDIT: - To follow up on the answers below

Every Neural Network will have edge weights associated with them. These edge weights are adjusted during the training session of a Neural Network.

This is exactly where I am struggling, how do/should I vision this secondary memory? Is this like RAM? that doesn't seem logical.. The reason I ask because I haven't encountered an example online that defines or specifies this secondary memory (for example in something more concrete such as an XML file, or maybe even a huge array).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Memory storage is implementation-specific and not part of the algorithm per se. It is probably more useful to think about what you need to store rather than how to store it.

Consider a 3-layer multi-layer perceptron (fully connected) that has 3, 8, and 5 nodes in the input, hidden, and output layers, respectively (for this discussion, we can ignore bias inputs). Then a reasonable (and efficient) way to represent the needed weights is by two matrices: a 3x8 matrix for weights between the input and hidden layers and an 8x5 matrix for the weights between the hidden and output layers.

For this example, you need to store the weights and the network shape (number of nodes per layer). There are many ways you could store this information. It could be in an XML file or a user-defined binary file. If you were using python, you could save both matrices to a binary .npy file and encode the network shape in the file name. If you implemented the algorithm, it is up to you how to store the persistent data. If, on the other hand, you are using an existing machine learning software package, it probably has its own I/O functions for storing and loading a trained network.

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Thank you very much! –  Ben Z. Apr 4 '13 at 21:37

Every Neural Network will have edge weights associated with them. These edge weights are adjusted during the training session of a Neural Network. I suppose your doubt is about storing these edge weights. Well, these values are stored separately in a secondary memory so that they can be retained for future use in the Neural Network.

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Yes exactly where I was going. But I am struggling with this secondary memory; is this like RAM, temporarily? that doesn't seem logical.. The reason I ask because I haven't encountered an example online that defines or specifies this secondary memory (for example in something more concrete such as an XML file, or maybe even a huge array). Thanks! –  Ben Z. Apr 2 '13 at 18:03
    
Thanks for your answer. I am not sure which to accept because they all compliment each other. But I will give you a +1 vote once I reach the min requirements. –  Ben Z. Apr 4 '13 at 21:39

I would expect discussion of the design of the model (neural network) would be kept separate from the discussion of the implementation, where data requirements like durability are addressed.

A particular library or framework might have a specific answer about durable storage, but if you're rolling your own from scratch, then it's up to you.

For example, why not just write the trained weights and topology in a file? Something like YAML or XML could serve as a format.

Also, while we're talking about state/storage and neural networks, you might be interested in investigating associative memory.

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Thanks you! I was actually thinking in the same direction for storage. But is this common / is this the 'formal' method to do it? The reason I ask because I haven't encountered an example online that defines or specifies this (for example, as you mentioned, in something more concrete such as an XML file, or maybe even a huge array). Thanks! –  Ben Z. Apr 2 '13 at 18:08
    
The "formality" stops with the mathematics. From the point of view of software design, there is nothing particularly special about (small scale) neural networks. –  phs Apr 2 '13 at 18:10
    
Thanks for your answer, it really helped. I am not sure which to accept because they all compliment each other. But I will give you a +1 vote as soon as I can. –  Ben Z. Apr 4 '13 at 21:40

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