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Hello everyone i want to ask question my html form, requires to input username/Email that you can put. Then it searches by username or email if in database that account exists if yes process. The script works, but only with email.

My problem is how to identify in input field is the user written an username or email? Now it checks both but for some reason it dosen't detect username only email typed.

function getUserEmailExist( $input )
    {
    global $database;

        if( preg_match( '/^[a-z0-9]+([_\\.-][a-z0-9]+)*@([a-z0-9]+([\.-][a-z0-9]+)*)+\\.[a-z]{2,}$/i', $input ) ) {
            $type = 2;
            $get = $database->checkExistRecovery( $input, $type );
        }

        if( preg_match( '/[^0-9A-Za-z]/', $input ) ) {
            $type = 1;
            $get = $database->checkExistRecovery( $input, $type );
        }

        if( $get ) {
            $this->updateRecover( $input, $type );
        } else {     
            return false;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
So the problem is that your second regex doesn't work? What would you like it to detect? –  kingkero Apr 2 '13 at 18:07
    
For your username check, you are checking for a negative ^ character set. ie, it cannot be [0-9A-Z-az]. –  Jon Apr 2 '13 at 18:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to move your email if statement below.

Because if the input is an email, it's going to match the second preg match anyway. So you're overwriting your $type variable.

Fixed.

    function getUserEmailExist( $input )
    {
        global $database;

        if( preg_match( '/[A-Za-z0-9]+/', $input ) ) {
            $type = 1;
            $get = $database->checkExistRecovery( $input, $type );
        }

if( preg_match( '/^[a-z0-9]+([_\\.-][a-z0-9]+)*@([a-z0-9]+([\.-][a-z0-9]+)*)+\\.[a-z]{2,}$/i', $input ) ) {
            $type = 2;
            $get = $database->checkExistRecovery( $input, $type );
        }

        if( $get ) {
            $this->updateRecover( $input, $type );
        } else {     
            return false;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, let me try. But i already tried that way, maybe this time it will work. Nope it dosen't work, still the same maybe i did something processing it? but i don't really think, becouse with email it works maybe only with type –  karolis Apr 2 '13 at 18:10
    
Updated it again. –  Adrian Apr 2 '13 at 18:12
    
Yep it worked, don't really understand why, becouse what you told me i did it just a minute ago, yes i replaced the first was username then email but still didin't work, maybe had some mistake in mine code when copied your it worked, thanks. –  karolis Apr 2 '13 at 18:19
    
@karolis if you want to know why, read the comment on your question ;) you used a negative character set, when he updated the code he removed the ^ from within the username check set. –  Jon Apr 2 '13 at 18:21

I think you want your second regex to be /[A-Za-z0-9]+/. You are currently looking for anything that doesn't contain those characters.

share|improve this answer

Why do you care about all that validation logic? I can't see your actual DB queries, but it seems you could easily do something like this:

SELECT * FROM users
WHERE email = ? OR username = ?

Where ? would be the email or username value.

share|improve this answer
    
Possibly password recovery, so he knows which record to pull to allow a change, etc. Though I think it should still be done with username =? OR email=? and then prepare the value twice in to that statement. –  Jon Apr 2 '13 at 18:13
    
Yeah, i know that myself there two reasons i don't do that: first - coding something that needs a bit more security. secound - i already check database if exists or not by making them seperate by $type example: if type == 1 search username if type == 2 search email –  karolis Apr 2 '13 at 18:14
    
@Jon Absolutely, a prepared statement is preferable here. I do think it is important to look at each email/password and username/password combo however. You can't just do WHERE (email = ? OR username = ?) AND password = ?. –  Mike Brant Apr 2 '13 at 18:17
    
@MikeBrant agreed completely for logging a user in - I didn't see a password being dealt with and assumed it was to find a username or email to then get the email of and send the user a password recovery link or similar - I hadn't assumed it was for authentication purposes. ^^ –  Jon Apr 2 '13 at 18:20
1  
@karolis You might think about posting such to codereview.stackexchange.com or similar to get feedback. Like personally, if you were a developer on my team, I would question the logic of actually calling your UpdateRecover() method from within this method. This method is named getUserEmailExist() and IMO should do just that and only that (verify if the user exists via email/username and return the user id to the caller). The caller could then decide whether to trigger the UpdateRecover() based on the response. –  Mike Brant Apr 2 '13 at 18:40

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