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I have this code but it does not do what I want totally, I takes a list of tuples;

[(3,2),(1,2),(1,3),(1,2),(4,3),(3,2),(1,2)]

and gives

[(1,3),(4,3),(3,2),(1,2)]

but I want it to give

[(1,3),(4,3)]

where am I doing wrong? Thanks in advance.

eliminate :: [(Int,Int)] -> [(Int,Int)]
eliminate [] = []
eliminate (x:xs)
    | isTheSame xs x  = eliminate xs
    | otherwise       = x : eliminate xs


isTheSame :: [(Int,Int)] -> (Int,Int) -> Bool
isTheSame [] _ = False
isTheSame (x:xs) a
    | (fst x) == (fst a) && (snd x) == (snd a)  = True
    | otherwise                 = isTheSame xs a
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5  
What do you mean with "totally", why exactly should (3,2) and (1,2) be excluded? –  Landei Apr 2 '13 at 18:50
    
I am searchin for a function that eliminates the duplicates completely, only the unique ones should be there, I guess I should change my implementation :/ –  Karavana Apr 2 '13 at 18:55
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The code is almost correct. Just change this line

    | isTheSame xs x  = eliminate xs

to

    | isTheSame xs x  = eliminate $ filter (/=x) xs   

The reason is that if x is contained in xs, you want to delete all occurences of x.

That said, there are a few parts in your code sample that could be expressed more elegantly:

  • (fst x) == (fst a) && (snd x) == (snd a) is the same as x == a
  • isTheSame is the same as elem, only with its arguments reversed

Thus, we could express the function eliminate like this:

eliminate [] = []
eliminate (x:xs)
  | x `elem` xs = eliminate $ filter (/=x) xs
  | otherwise = x : eliminate xs      
share|improve this answer
    
ow yes! I was filtering that part to exclude x from the xs part but I was not able to manage it thank you :) –  Karavana Apr 2 '13 at 18:59
2  
@Karavana: Check my edit, you should use elem instead of your custom, highly specialized isTheSame function (which also has a strange name) –  Niklas B. Apr 2 '13 at 19:01
    
I was just about to suggest that change. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 2 '13 at 19:02
    
@Daniel: Which change? :) –  Niklas B. Apr 2 '13 at 19:03
    
This one, you have just missed the grace period ;) –  Daniel Fischer Apr 2 '13 at 19:04
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This should do it:

-- all possibilities of picking one elt from a domain
pick :: [a] -> [([a], a)]
pick []     = [] 
pick (x:xs) = (xs,x) : [ (x:dom,y) | (dom,y) <- pick xs]

unique xs = [x | (xs,x) <- pick xs, not (elem x xs)]

Testing:

*Main Data.List> unique [(3,2),(1,2),(1,3),(1,2),(4,3),(3,2),(1,2)]
[(1,3),(4,3)]

More here and in Splitting list into a list of possible tuples


Following Landei's lead, here's a short version (although it'll return its results sorted):

import Data.List

unique xs = [x | [x] <- group . sort $ xs]
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good implementation Will, I appreciate your effort but I am interested in whats wrong with my implementation, but yours is perfect tho :) –  Karavana Apr 2 '13 at 19:00
1  
@Karavana no problem! :) –  Will Ness Apr 2 '13 at 19:03
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Inefficient reference implementation.

import Data.List

dups xs = xs \\ nub xs
eliminate xs = filter (`notElem` dups xs) xs
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A shorter version (but results will be sorted):

import Data.List

eliminate :: [(Int,Int)] -> [(Int,Int)]
eliminate = concat . filter ((== 1) . length) . group . sort

Or with Maybe (thank you, Marimuthu):

import Data.List
import Data.Maybe

eliminate = mapMaybe f . group . sort where f [x] = Just x; f _ = Nothing

Thinking about... we could use lists instead of Maybe:

import Data.List

eliminate = (>>= f) . group . sort where  f [x] = [x]; f _ = []
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a reason for using join instead of concat? By using concat, the import of Control.Monad is not necessary. –  kaan Apr 2 '13 at 19:12
    
No. Thank you, I fixed it. –  Landei Apr 2 '13 at 19:19
1  
eliminate = mapMaybe f . group . sort where f [x] = Just x; f _ = Nothing since catMaybes . map f is simply mapMaybe f –  Marimuthu Madasamy Apr 2 '13 at 19:46
    
Thank you, I never used that one... –  Landei Apr 2 '13 at 21:45
2  
[x | [x] <- group . sort $ xs]. :) –  Will Ness Apr 2 '13 at 22:13
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