Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

What's a simple and efficient way to shuffle a dataframe in pandas, by rows or by columns? I.e. how to write a function shuffle(df, n, axis=0) that takes a dataframe, a number of shuffles n, and an axis (axis=0 is rows, axis=1 is columns) and returns a copy of the dataframe that has been shuffled n times.

Edit: key is to do this without destroying the row/column labels of the dataframe. If you just shuffle df.index that loses all that information. I want the resulting df to be the same as the original except with the order of rows or order of columns different.

Edit2: My question was unclear. When I say shuffle the rows, I mean shuffle each row independently. So if you have two columns a and b, I want each row shuffled on its own, so that you don't have the same associations between a and b as you do if you just re-order each row as a whole. Something like:

for 1...n:
  for each col in df: shuffle column
return new_df

But hopefully more efficient than naive looping. This does not work for me:

def shuffle(df, n, axis=0):
        shuffled_df = df.copy()
        for k in range(n):
            shuffled_df.apply(np.random.shuffle(shuffled_df.values),axis=axis)
        return shuffled_df

df = pandas.DataFrame({'A':range(10), 'B':range(10)})
shuffle(df, 5)
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted
In [16]: def shuffle(df, n=1, axis=0):     
    ...:     df = df.copy()
    ...:     for _ in range(n):
    ...:         df.apply(np.random.shuffle, axis=axis)
    ...:     return df
    ...:     

In [17]: df = pd.DataFrame({'A':range(10), 'B':range(10)})

In [18]: shuffle(df)

In [19]: df
Out[19]: 
   A  B
0  8  5
1  1  7
2  7  3
3  6  2
4  3  4
5  0  1
6  9  0
7  4  6
8  2  8
9  5  9
share|improve this answer
    
How do I distinguish rows from column shuffling here? –  user248237dfsf Apr 2 '13 at 19:13
    
Thanks.. I clarified my question which was unclear. I am looking to shuffle by row independently of other rows - so shuffle in such a way that you don't always have 1,5 together and 4,8 together (but also not just a column shuffle which limits you to two choices) –  user248237dfsf Apr 2 '13 at 19:18
    
great solution! –  Zelazny7 Apr 2 '13 at 19:33
11  
df.apply(np.random.permutation) works too –  Zelazny7 Apr 2 '13 at 19:35
1  
warning I thought df.apply(np.random.permutation) would work as the solution df.reindex(np.random.permutation(df.index)) and looked neater, but actually they behave differently. The latter maintains association between columns of the same row, the former doesn't. My misunderstanding, of course, but hopefully it will save other people from the same mistake. –  gozzilli Feb 12 at 10:33

Use numpy's random.permuation function:

In [1]: df = pd.DataFrame({'A':range(10), 'B':range(10)})

In [2]: df
Out[2]:
   A  B
0  0  0
1  1  1
2  2  2
3  3  3
4  4  4
5  5  5
6  6  6
7  7  7
8  8  8
9  9  9


In [3]: df.reindex(np.random.permutation(df.index))
Out[3]:
   A  B
0  0  0
5  5  5
6  6  6
3  3  3
8  8  8
7  7  7
9  9  9
1  1  1
2  2  2
4  4  4
share|improve this answer
8  
+1 because this is exactly what I was looking for (even though it turns out it's not what the OP wanted) –  Doug Paul Nov 22 '13 at 14:45
2  
Also can use df.iloc[np.random.permutation(np.arange(len(df)))] if there's dupes and stuff (and may be faster for mi). –  Andy Hayden Jan 28 '14 at 23:13
2  
Nice method. Is there a way to do it in-place though? –  Andrew Sep 27 '14 at 15:48

This might be more useful when you want your index shuffled.

def shuffle(df):
    index = list(df.index)
    random.shuffle(index)
    df = df.ix[index]
    df.reset_index()
    return df

It selects new df using new index, then reset them.

share|improve this answer
    
Great, simple, works, used it. Happy. –  Tennessee Leeuwenburg Apr 29 at 3:03

I resorted to adapting @root 's answer slightly and using the raw values directly. Of course, this means you lose the ability to do fancy indexing but it works perfectly for just shuffling the data.

In [1]: import numpy

In [2]: import pandas

In [3]: df = pandas.DataFrame({"A": range(10), "B": range(10)})    

In [4]: %timeit df.apply(numpy.random.shuffle, axis=0)
1000 loops, best of 3: 406 µs per loop

In [5]: %%timeit
   ...: for view in numpy.rollaxis(df.values, 1):
   ...:     numpy.random.shuffle(view)
   ...: 
10000 loops, best of 3: 22.8 µs per loop

In [6]: %timeit df.apply(numpy.random.shuffle, axis=1)
1000 loops, best of 3: 746 µs per loop

In [7]: %%timeit                                      
for view in numpy.rollaxis(df.values, 0):
    numpy.random.shuffle(view)
   ...: 
10000 loops, best of 3: 23.4 µs per loop

Note that numpy.rollaxis brings the specified axis to the first dimension and then let's us iterate over arrays with the remaining dimensions, i.e., if we want to shuffle along the first dimension (columns), we need to roll the second dimension to the front, so that we apply the shuffling to views over the first dimension.

In [8]: numpy.rollaxis(df, 0).shape
Out[8]: (10, 2) # we can iterate over 10 arrays with shape (2,) (rows)

In [9]: numpy.rollaxis(df, 1).shape
Out[9]: (2, 10) # we can iterate over 2 arrays with shape (10,) (columns)

Your final function then uses a trick to bring the result in line with the expectation for applying a function to an axis:

def shuffle(df, n=1, axis=0):     
    df = df.copy()
    axis = int(not axis) # pandas.DataFrame is always 2D
    for _ in range(n):
        for view in numpy.rollaxis(df.values, axis):
            numpy.random.shuffle(view)
    return df
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.