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I have the following abstract class:

public abstract class BaseClass{
    public object contents { get; set; }
    public Action<BaseClass> mutator;
    public abstract void Initialise();
}

This will be used by several classes, which will override the Initialize method to assign a value to contents, which will in turn be mutated using the mutator delegate at specific points in time.

I have the following static class, with each method intended to be used as a mutator:

public static class Mutators{
    public static void VariantA(A inputObj){
        // inputObj.contents = something else
    }

    public static void VariantB(A inputObj) { } // etc. etc.
}

I then have class A, which implements BaseClass. I am trying to assign Mutators.VariantA to the mutator delegate, but i'm not able to.

public class A : BaseClass{
    public A(){
        mutator = Mutators.VariantA;
    }

    public override void Initialise(){
        /* set the value of contents property here */
    }
}

Specifically I get the following error: A method or delegateMutators.VariantA(A)' parameters do not match delegate System.Action<BaseClass>(BaseClass)' parameters (CS0123)

I understand that Mutators.VariantA(A) requires an object of type A, and the Action was declared to accept an input of type BaseClass, however as class A implements BaseClass I thought I would have been able to do this ?

Coming from dynamically typed languages i'm having a tough time getting to grips with working with types in this way :(

Is there any way I can point to a function with an input of the abstract type in this way ? Do I need to look at some other design pattern ?

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I understand that Mutators.VariantA(A) requires an object of type A, and the Action was declared to accept an input of type BaseClass, however as class A implements BaseClass I thought I would have been able to do this ?

Absolutely not.

An Action<BaseClass> has to be able to accept any BaseClass object. So for example, if your code were valid, I would be able to write:

Action<BaseClass> mutator = Mutators.VariantA;
mutator.Invoke(new B());

(Where B is another class derived from BaseClass.)

The fact that B derives from BaseClass makes it valid for the invocation - but it's not going to help your VariantA method work nicely.

It's not really clear why you have a mutator here - I strongly suspect you should abstract BaseClass from its mutations. I still don't follow what you're trying to achieve, but this design pattern isn't going to help you get there in a type-safe way.

You could write:

public abstract class BaseClass<T> where T : BaseClass<T> {
    public object Contents { get; set; }
    public Action<T> Mutator { get; set; }
    public abstract void Initialise();
}

... then:

public class A : BaseClass<A> {
    public A() {
        Mutator = Mutators.VariantA;
    }
}

... as then you'd be writing something which can mutate "A" values. But in my experience this sort of generic nesting gets really messy, really quickly.

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Jon Skeet you are way toooooo Fast lol –  DJ KRAZE Apr 2 '13 at 19:15
    
The reason I have a mutator is because I need to be able to allow the user to specify what type of mutation they would like to perform on a class that holds varying data types. I also want to be able to allow custom mutator functions to be set. Thanks for clearing this up for me Jon. –  Sherlock Apr 2 '13 at 19:41

I've used your current example and changed the Method Signature of one of the classes to the following and it works

    public abstract class BaseClass
    {
        public object contents { get; set; }
        public Action<BaseClass> mutator;
        public abstract void Initialise();
    }
    public static class Mutators
    {
        public static void VariantA(BaseClass baseClass)
        {
            // inputObj.contents = something else
        }

        public static void VariantB(A inputObj) { } // etc. etc.
    }
    public class A : BaseClass
    {
        public A()
        {
            mutator = Mutators.VariantA;
        }

        public override void Initialise()
        {
            /* set the value of contents property here */
        }
    }
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