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This is my whole code..what I am trying to do is to have-. when DOM is ready first div shows on page and second one after a delay and then third one and so on up to 150.

Problem with the current code is that, whole 150 div loads at once after a small delay.

My code -

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset="UTF-8">
<title>Test for dashed div</title>
<style type="text/css">
.dashdiv
{
    width: 150px;
    height: 50px;
    background: #ae2d3e;
    float:left;
    box-shadow: 10px 10px 6px #d4a7b0;
    margin: 5px;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <?php
    for($i =0; $i < 150; $i++)
    {
    ?>
    <div class="dashdiv">
    This is a div text
    </div>
    <?php   
    }
    ?>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){
    $('div.dashdiv').each(function()
    {
          $(this).hide().delay(1000).fadeIn(1850);
    });
});
</script>   
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem you're facing, which no one has mentioned, is that jQuery delay() is only chainable on an fx queue. So, using it after hide() will not work. A quick fix to get it working would be to use an effect in place of hide(), ie:

$('div.dashdiv').each(function(i) {
  $(this).fadeOut(0).delay(1000*i).fadeIn(1850);
});
share|improve this answer
1  
here's a fiddle: jsfiddle.net/vDLA7 – wes Apr 2 '13 at 23:06
    
Very good point raised +1 :) – swapnesh Apr 3 '13 at 3:38

Try using the index argument that is automatically assigned for every iteration of each to extend the delay in a linear manner:

$('div.dashdiv').each(function(i) {
   $(this).delay(1000*i).fadeIn(1850);
});

Also, following your comment, the style of the div elements should be changed to make them hidden:

.dashdiv {
    display:none;
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
the only problem with the code is it first loads whole 150 div at once and then fadeout and then starts adding one by one – swapnesh Apr 2 '13 at 19:29
    
@swapnesh Followed your example. To achieve what you've described, just add display:none to the style rule of .dashdiv. This also means that the hide() method is redundant here. – Boaz Apr 2 '13 at 19:31
    
@swapnesh Edited the answer in accordance. – Boaz Apr 2 '13 at 19:35

You can use :

Html:

<div id="parent">
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
    <div class="child"></div>
</div>

jQuery:

$('#parent .child')
    .hide()
    .each(function(index){
        var _this = this;
        setTimeout( function(){ $(_this).fadeIn(); }, 5000*index );
    });

demo at http://jsfiddle.net/gaby/eGWx9/1/

share|improve this answer

Here's a way to delay and fadeIn a div only once the previous div has finished. It uses the fadeIn callback to move to the next div in the array:

// hide all
$('.dashdiv').hide();

// fade in each div one by one
divs = document.getElementsByClassName('dashdiv');
(function fade(i){
    if(i < divs.length){
        $(divs[i]).delay(1000).fadeIn(1850, function(){
            fade(++i);
        });
    }
})(0);

Or without getElementsByClassName.

// hide all
$('.dashdiv').hide();

// fade in each div one by one
(function fade(i){
    if(i < $('.dashdiv').length){
        $($('.dashdiv')[i]).delay(1000).fadeIn(1850, function(){
            fade(++i);
        });
    }
})(0);

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/louisbros/RdxS6/

share|improve this answer
1  
What's the point of using vanilla JS document.getElementsByClassName if you're already using jQuery fadeIn function? – Maciej Gurban Apr 2 '13 at 20:19
1  
Why does it matter? You could easily use $('.dashdiv') in it's place if you wanted to. To me it is more readable. – louisbros Apr 2 '13 at 20:21
    
It matters. It's called consistency. When you work as part of a team you'll learn not to think with the "to me" mentality. You're already using a library to sit between you and the JS functions. If there's no need to use JS functions directly, don't. Writing everything with JS is a different story of course. So @DiH is correct, this is not a matter of "Why not?" it's a matter of "Why?". – Adi Apr 3 '13 at 12:08
    
I don't agree. jQuery is not designed to replace JS functions, it is a library. – louisbros Apr 3 '13 at 18:29

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